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ENERGY MANAGEMENT


Refurbishment Options


Option 3


Option 3


Option2


Option 2


Option 1


Option 1


Current


Current


Figure 10: Section showing external corridor added to Nightingale pavilion to allow partition into multi- bed rooms. The corridor is designed to allow cross- ventilation via a clerestorey.


Figure 9: Bradford Royal Infirmary, refurbishment options. lower target hospitals at £5,060 m2 , but that


target is in reality not achieved at this scale. In payback terms, the new-build option comes into its own in the 2030’s when ‘business-as-usual’ hospitals will have to suffer radical air-conditioning refits. The Addenbrooke’s refurbishment schemes would cost between £1,000 and £1,300 m2


. The


Nightingale adaptation schemes are very similar, i.e. well within current NHS refurbishment norms. The new Director of DH Estates and Facilities Policy believes the optimal adaptation schemes could be rolled into the annual back log maintenance operation across the NHS. These are grounds for optimism and action.


4 National Health Service Sustainable Development Unit. Saving carbon, improving health. London, NHS. 2008.


5 Poulter D. Improving Energy Efficiency in the NHS, Applications for Capital Funding 2012-13. Gateway Information 1838. London: Department of Health, 2012.


6 NHS Sustainable Development Unit. Sustainable Development Strategy for the Health, Public Health and Social Care System, Consultation. 2013.


7 Department of Health. Health Technical Memorandum 07-07: Sustainable Health and Social Care Buildings. London: The Stationery Office 2009.





References 1 National Health Service. Heatwave Plan for England: Protecting Health and Reducing Harm from Extreme Heat and Heatwaves. Online at http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Summerhealth/ Documents/dh_HeatwavePlan2011.pdf Accessed 23 February 2012.


2 As reference 1, p. 5. 3 National Health Service. NHS Workforce: summary of staff. Results from the 2012 census. Online at www.hscic.gov.uk/searchcatalogue? productid=11215&topics=1%2fWorkforce %2fStaff+numbers&sort=Relevance&size= 10&page=1#top Accessed on 14 May 2013.


B This section summarises Short CA, Al-Maiyah S. Design Strategy for Low-Energy Ventilation and Cooling of Hospitals. Build Res Inf. 2009; 37 (3): 264-92.


8 National Health Service Information Centre. Hospital Estates and Facilities Statistics. 2010. Online at http://www.hefs.ic.nhs.uk/ ReportFilter.asp Accessed on 14 May 2013.


9 Lomas KJ, Giridharan R. Thermal Comfort Standards: Measured Internal Temperatures and Thermal Resilience to Climate Change of Free- Running Buildings: A Case Study of Hospital Wards. Building and Environment 2012; 55: 57-72.


10 Short CA, Lomas KJ, Giridharan R, Fair AJ. Building Resilience to Overheating into 1960s UK Hospital Buildings Within The Constraint


‘The strategy for the Nightingale pavilions seeks to enhance these buildings’ already high level of resilience to overheating (and cold weather).’


of the National Carbon Reduction Target: Adaptive Strategies. Building and Environment 2012; 55: 73-95.


11 Lomas KJ, Giridharan R, Short CA, Fair AJ. Resilience of ‘Nightingale’ hospital wards in a changing climate. Build Serv Eng Res & Tech 2012; 33 (1): 81-103.


12 Giridharan R, Lomas KJ, Short CA, Fair AJ, Performance of hospital spaces in summer: a case study of a ‘Nucleus’-type hospital in the UK Midlands., Energy and Buildings 2013, in press, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2013.07.001


13 Department of Health, National Service Framework for Older People, 2001, http://www.dh.gov.uk/prod_consum_dh/groups/ dh_digitalassets/@dh/@en/documents/ digitalasset/dh_4071283.pdf Accessed on 21 July 2011.


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IFHE DIGEST 2014


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