This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BUILDING DESIGN


Juliana Valverde – Architect Fabrício Lira – Architect


The role of space in rehabilitation centres


This article provides an analysis of the reconfiguration of the Children’s Rehabilitation Centre in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil to ensure the best care for all patients using the space.


Complex buildings, such as rehabilitation centers, encompass aspects that are difficult to be integrated. This complexity originates from the need to provide different functions in the same physical space, such as medical care and laboratorial centers, combined with the diversity of aspects involved in health rehabilitation care – physical therapy buildings, for example. Although architectural elements are


usually not taken into consideration, they do interact (to a greater or lesser degree) in rehabilitation treatments. Form appears as one of these elements and here it will be analysed not as aesthetics, volumetric and compositional architecture, but as an active agent in the dynamic use of space, subjected to identification and interpretation, and as a key element for the quality of the patient care.


Healthcare environments should provide


comfort to counteract the psychological and symbolic effects that are commonly assigned to them. The symbolic effects usually refer to the association of the space with disease and feelings of sadness and hopelessness, but also with it being a place for cure, recovery and the search for better life quality.1 Rehabilitation centers are usually used in


a fragmented and diverse way, which requires constant revision of their functionality in order to associate administrative and clinical activities with the building maintenance, without affecting the comfort and healthfulness of the buildings. As such, in addition to considering the lifecycle of a building – conception, construction, operation, evacuation and recovery – it is important to think of buildings that stimulate positive, healing and productive effects on patients.2 In 2001 the Brazilian Ministry of Health


created a new paradigm with the implementation of the National Humanization


IFHE DIGEST 2014 2 1 1 2


2 The interior of the Rehabilitation Gymnasium. 1= private rooms ; 2 = common use room.


Policy (NHP), as part of the Public Unified Health Service (from the Portuguese SUS), aimed at valuing the different players involved in healthcare. This policy suggests new interactions among patients, users, collaborators and managers, with a view to achieving more effective and better quality services. Humanisation means an improved global health environment for users, valuing people that access the health services and considering both the patient and the practitioner as an essential part of the


Juliana Viégas Valverde


Juliana Viégas Valverde is an architect who graduated from Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (FAU-UFRJ) (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) in 2001. She is an expert in Ergonomics, from Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-RJ). Currently she is studying environmental comfort in health care at the Architecture and Urbanism Graduate Program of Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil (PPGAU-UFRN).


process, although the focus is still on the patient.3


Humanisation also takes into


account physical, subjective and social aspects, adopting an ethical stance of respect for each other, accepting the unknown and recognising the physical and mental limits of the individual.4 In 2006, a new health humanisation


policy (PNHAH), built on the previous one, recognised the therapeutic attributes of the space as important components to the wellbeing of patients in healthcare


Fabrício Lira


Fabrício Lira is an architect who graduated from the Federal University do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN) (Natal, Brazil) in 1999. He is a lecturer at Facex University (Natal, Brazil). Currently he is a master’s student at the Architecture and Urbanism Graduate Program of Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (PPGAU- UFRN), researching morphology and use of the constructed environment.


87


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100