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ENERGY MANAGEMENT


construction period were confirmed by an M&V report. Annual M&V reports (Aug – July), detailing the savings, growth and change within the hospital, factored in the energy unit cost changes and finally weather adjusted to year 2002.


• An awareness programme was developed in partnership with the ESCO that facilitated a better understanding of the energy performance contract among the 12,000 employees and surrounding community. Staff reports of leaking faucets, overcooling or overheating have increased as well as energy saving suggestions. It was noted that staff began to implement these measures at home and are trying to change old habits for excessive use of energy.


• Other hospitals began to request information about similar projects in their hospitals. National Resources Canada (NRCan) with the Ontario Hospital association (OHA) organised a workshop to provide additional information about the incentive program and the use of ESCO to assist with cost-saving measures.


• Training for maintenance staff was part of the project to optimise and efficiently use the new equipment.


Operational and maintenance challenges Challenges include financial challenges such as reduced levels of investment in new facilities; Increased deferred capital in existing facilities; Reactive versus proactive maintenance (result is failure and downtime); and any available capital directed to priority of patient care. Other challenges include rising costs such


as labour, operations, and energy (high volatility); Increasing regulatory compliance; Environmental concerns; and infrastructure renewal.


An energy services contract with an ESCO had good support due to the fact that it addressed all of the above challenges. An ESCO provides a ‘self funded’ program


whereby the equipment and technology installed to modernise buildings and facilities is paid by guaranteed energy and operational savings.


Energy reductions and environmental impact The implementation of this project has a positive impact on the environment and global warming. The project saved 8,185 tons of CO2


, or the need for 25,654 trees. The


energy reduction for the three campuses is 125,739 GJ. The total area of the three campuses is 328,990 m2


, which resulted in


The Awareness Program booths held at the three TOH campuses by ESCO and TOH.


‘An awareness programme was developed in partnership with the ESCO that facilitated a better understanding of the energy performance contract among the 12,000 employees and surrounding community.’


0.382 GJ savings/m2 . The first year construction period savings


were estimated at $488,617, based on an M&V report. The impact on the environment from the recycling of the fluorescent tubes and magnetic ballasts in the lighting upgrades project is 9.8 tons glass, 123 kg aluminum, 154 kg phosphor and 1.02 kg mercury.


Equipment and labour The intent was to implement the most efficient and tested technologies at all campuses. The equipment was all procured within the Canadian and North American markets. Life cycle costing (25 year) considering energy efficiency, operating cost and maintenance requirements were the primary drivers in the selection of the equipment. The versatile age range of the buildings at the campuses was a challenge to this contract. The selection of the subcontractors relied on experience working in health care environment.


Measurement and verification method The Performance of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) that are proposed in this report refers to the amount of savings in


‘An ESCO provides a ‘self funded’ programme whereby the equipment and technology installed to modernise buildings and facilities is paid by guaranteed energy and operational savings.’


IFHE DIGEST 2014


utilities, which occurs from the implementation of the ECMs. Guaranteed performance of the ECM’s forms the basis of the Energy Retrofit Solution Contract. Measurement and verification of the performance of ECMs can be accomplished by more than one method. Selection of the most efficient method to be used for each measure requires consideration of multiple factors, including the type of utility affected, the magnitude of savings compared to total utility usage, the complexity of the measure itself, accuracy to which the performance must be determined, and cost. Two methods are used in general for


verifying ECMs performance – a whole building approach or a retrofit isolation approach. The Ottawa Hospital and ESCO used the whole building approach as the means for guaranteeing the savings.


Verification by approach For the purpose of verification, the following apply: • The selected Base Year is the calendar year 2002.


• METRIX Utility Accounting Software is used for the analysis.


• TOH to provide ESCO with photocopies of all Utility Bills starting January 2003.


• Base load growth to be studied and adjusted for if applicable by base line adjustments (BLA).


• Energy savings = Pre-project Energy use – Post-project Energy use +/- BLA • Ottawa’s Airport weather data


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