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BUILDING DESIGN


to BIM, there are a number of large-scale Healthcare facility projects under construction that have a substantial BIM handover deliverable requirement. The most publicised are Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia; Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment, Hobart, Tasmania; and Princess Margaret Hospital for Children in Perth, Western Australia.


Royal Adelaide Hospital As the largest hospital in South Australia, with a planned floorspace covering 170,000 m2


,


Royal Adelaide Hospital will care for more than 80,000 inpatients per year with 800 overnight and same-day beds, an ambulatory care centre, operating theatre suite and all clinical and non-clinical support services necessary for the provision of high quality and safe patient care. The BIM strategy on this project will not


only aid in design analysis, design-to- fabrication workflows and construction planning and coordination, but also aims to capture and re-use data for improved facility management throughout the hospital’s life cycle. Time will tell what opportunities may arise


as BIM is further incorporated into the design, construction and facilities management processes. Certainly, as the industry embraces BIM and seeks to exploit from both the process and the tool, we are on the right track to reduce project life-cycle costs and provide less disruption to clinical activities during construction projects. The lessons learnt, processes and


technologies from these pioneering projects will hopefully be shared so that the AEC industry in Australia and deliver more sustainable, cost-effective, and maintainable facilities that also deliver better patient outcomes. With a positive track record of successful projects, the Australian Government will surely mandate a national plan for BIM implementation in Australia and bring us in line with our counterparts in the UK.


References 1 BuildingSmart Australasia. (2012). National Building Information Modelling Initiative: A Report for the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education. Australia.


2 Wheeldon D. (2011). BIM’s the way forward, says


Figure 7: Concept for BIM enabled Facilities Management Interface.


Australian Government. Retrieved 12 December 2012 http://www.architectureanddesign.com.au/ news/industry-news/bim-s-the-way-forward-says -australian-government


3 Gallaher MP, O’Connor AC, Dettbarn JL Jr, Gilday LT. (2004). National Standards Institute: Cost Analysis of Inadequate Interoperability in the U.S. Capital Facilities Industry, NIST GCR 04-867. Retrieved 30 August 2013 http://fire.nist.gov/ bfrlpubs/build04/art022.html





4 Succar B. (2009). The Five Components of BIM Performance Measurement. Retrieved 07 January 2013 http://www.academia.edu/227815/ The_Five_Components_of_BIM_Performance _Measurement.


5 CRC for Construction Innovation. (2009). National Guidelines for Digital Modelling. http://buildingsmart.org.au/digital-modelling- guidelines-dmg-new-review.


6 Arup O. (1970) The Key Speech, Retrieved


30 August 2013 http://www.arup.com/Home/ Publications/The _Key_Speech.aspx


7 Gu N & London K. Understanding and facilitating BIM adoption in the AEC industry. Automation in Construction 2010; 19(8): 988-99.


8 Smith DK & Tardif M. (2009). Building Information Modeling: A Strategic Implementation Guide for Architects, Engineers, Constructors, and Real Estate Asset Managers. John Wiley & Sons Inc., New Jersey.


9 The Woodhouse Partnership Ltd. (2012). ISO 55000 documents now approved almost unanimously to move to Final Draft International Standard (FDIS) status. Retrieved 30 August 2013 http://www.assetmanagementstandards.com


10 ,K Pramod Reddy. (2012). BIM for Building Owners and Developers: Making a business case for using BIM on projects. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc.


Providing insights into the vast field of healthcare engineering and facility management


IFHE DIGEST 2014 55


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