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BUILDING DESIGN


TOWARDS INTEGRATION Taking the Australian industry forward


WHERE WE WERE 0-2D


Manual and CAD based (2D or 3D)


WHERE WE ARE


1-MODELLING Single-disciplinary use of object-based 3D modelling software within one discipline


Representation ESD PLAN PLAN PLAN NEXT STEP


2- COLLABORATION Sharing of object-based models between two or more disciplines


Prototype Efficiency


TOWARDS INTEGRATION


WHERE WE ARE GOING 3-INTEGRATION


Integration of several multi-disciplinary models using model servers of other network-based technologies


Full Information Capture Project Economics Lifecylce Economics


Manual 2D CAD 2D 0A 0B


BUSINESS MODEL ISOLATED Legend


Communication type Traditional


UPTAKE Digital Figure 3: BIM Maturity Model from Australia’s CRC for Construction Innovation, National Digital Modelling Guidelines (2009). 5


‘From the author’s perspective, best practice indicates that it is the business objectives that should decide how BIM technology and processes develop.’


Future opportunities Within design and construction sectors of the Australian healthcare industry, there is a growing momentum around the awareness of the opportunities associated with BIM. Now that BIM technologies are becoming more commonly applied in construction, there is some data starting to be exchanged at project handover. This is allowing asset and facilities managers to engage in the process. There are owner/operators now asking for BIM deliverables and thus expecting a collaborative process centered on a coordinated and federated BIM model and process.


Healthcare facilities are inherently


complex by nature. As stated previously, they IFHE DIGEST 2014


3D Intelligent3D 1A


1B


One Way 2A


Two Way 2B


TRUST COLLABORATIVE


Local Server 3A


Distribution Information Building Project


Web Server 3B


Collect Information


Information Management Repository Life of Building


INTEGRATED


Figure 4: Stakeholder engagement visualization using BIM.


are service-heavy structures – with many mechanical, electrical and hydraulic systems – and then there are the resultant complexities in ever-developing models of care which could result in internal re-designs and new fit-outs every five to ten years. The base-building component will often last a lot longer than the internal (fit-out) elements. When a design goes through a


collaborative process all design decisions can be considered together. According to Sir Ove Arup (1970) ‘the term ‘Total Architecture’ implies that all relevant design decisions have


been considered together… integrated into a whole by a well organised team empowered to fix priorities.’6


With the use of BIM


technologies there is the ability to streamline approvals and engagement processes through the ability to visualise in 3D, but also reduce risk in the construction period (where costs and time escalate). Figure 4 is an example of how stakeholder engagement can be enhanced and streamlined through the use of accurate 3D graphical visualisation that accurately reflects the finished product. Through procedures such as ‘clash


53


3D CAD


Modelling software


Single platform/IFC


Interoperability


3D CAD


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