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QUALITY MANAGEMENT


Jacques Roos – Head of the capital project management department at Strasbourg University Hospital


The ISO 9001:2008 certification journey


This article details the journey taken by the restructuring unit of the Strasbourg University Hospital (CERHUS) to achieve ISO 9001:2008 certification.


The CERHUS restructuring unit is responsible for handling real estate operations for the establishment. As an integral part of the investment and logistics management centre, the unit comprises seven technical executives (six engineers and one architect) and four administrative staff, specialising in public contracts associated with building works. The unit was created in 2000 when the


New Civilian Hospital was built at a cost of 300 million euros. Currently the department is also responsible for another major operation costing €230 million, together with a portfolio of other operations which cost between one and €40 million each. The department manages these operations via an organisation that works with project teams.


Why seek ISO 9001 certification? The approach that led the unit to take this step was based on the following: • Length of the operations. Between the first feasibility studies and the end of the guarantee of perfect completion, depending on its size and the accompanying circumstances, an operation may last for somewhere between four and 15 years.


• The missions have a very important horizontal component with a great many internal and external partners, together with the production and exchange of many documents.


• In view of the time limits involved, it must be possible to manage personnel changes affecting all the partners involved in an operation (management, users, internal partners, external partners) and in the project team.


• The functional and financial challenges create a commitment by the institution lasting for several decades.


• The risks of not achieving the targets (functions, cost, deadlines) and the risks of disputes are important.


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• The on-going evolution of medical and care practice, construction regulations and techniques, together with regulations relating to the purchases of services and works which require the backing of a technical and regulatory monitoring system associated with the in-service training of operators.


• The desire to improve the efficiency of the structure by making sure that the best practices are chosen.


The above factors result in stringent requirements for traceability, standardisation and monitoring of the activities concerned. A range of tools and methods were available to meet our aims to varying degrees. However, Standard ISO 9001: 2008 attracted us because of its international recognition and its suitability for a wide variety of activities. Moreover, it ensures quasi-permanent mobilisation of the team thanks to the recurrence of internal audits and certification audits. As indicated on the process mapping outline, (see Fig. 1) the conduct of an operation has been broken down into five


processes: 1 Feasibility process – The feasibility process comprises all the preliminary studies which are conducted from the referral to CERHUS by the management of the establishment on the basis of the expression of a need, in general, in broad outline. This process ends with the submission to the hospital management of a feasibility report which stipulates the need, taking into account the spatial solution or solutions proposed having regard to the regulatory and technical constraints which were defined at the preliminary studies stage, an estimated financial forecast, a forecast calendar and the procurement procedure or procedures proposed.


2 The programing process – The programming process is embarked upon after validation of the feasibility report by the management. It comprises all the


‘Standard ISO 9001: 2008 attracted us because of its international recognition and its suitability for a wide variety of activities.’


programming studies destined to define the needs of the future users and internal partners


(information system management, equipment management, security service, services responsible for maintenance and technical operation), together with the external partners (institutions responsible for town planning, the environment, and supervision of the public healthcare establishments). It is finalised by the drafting of the Detailed Technical Program (DTP) after validation by the partners of the aspects that concern them. It comprises all of the further financial, calendar and technical information needed to move on to the next phase, namely the selection of the team of designers within the framework of an MOP law procedure or the selection of a group of builders as part


Jacques Roos


Jacques Roos graduated and post graduated in architecture and practiced for 10 years as an architect.


Currently he is head of the project management department at University Hospital of Strasbourg in France.


He is also president of French hospital engineering association – Ingénieurs Hospitaliers de France.


IFHE DIGEST 2014


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