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MARC GARNER – VICE PRESIDENT, SECURE POWER DIVISION, SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC UK&I POWER MANAGEMENT


Keeping the power on: intelligence is key


Whether performing complex fetal surgery in utero at Care New England’s Women & Infants Hospital, or performing challenging eye surgery at London’s Moorfields Hospital, reliable uptime is critical. Marc Garner, VP, Secure Power Division, Schneider Electric UK&I, reveals how some of the World’s leading hospitals are leveraging IoT connectivity and distributed intelligence to ensure the power stays on at all times.


Unplanned power outages threaten patient safety, damage a provider’s reputation, and create financial strain, yet such incidents remain all too common. In August 2019, a major hospital in the east of England, UK, hit the headlines during a blackout on the national grid, when a back-up generator failed to come on, due to a faulty switchboard auxiliary battery. In the US, a power outage and two generator failures also forced a New York- based medical centre to cancel elective surgeries. The hospital experienced a campus-wide power outage after a tree limb fell, immediately triggering a generator to kick in. Within 30 minutes the backup generator failed. The medical centre then switched to a second, smaller generator, which also failed – leaving the hospital completely without power for two minutes.


While patient safety is a top priority, the financial impact of power disruption can also be severe. This was demonstrated during a blackout, in August 2003, which affected 45 million people in eight US states and 10 million people in parts of Canada. Healthcare facilities experienced hundreds of millions of dollars in lost revenue from cancelled services, legal liability, and damaged reputations. Six hospitals were in bankruptcy one year later.


These prenatal tests and treatments require the use of high-resolution fetal ultrasound, down to the sub-millimetre level. But for this technology to work I need smooth, reliable power. Stephen R Carr, clinician


Marc Garner


Marc Garner is the Vice President of Schneider Electric’s Secure Power Division in the UK and Ireland. He is a 13-year veteran of Schneider Electric having joined the company after graduating from the University of Sunderland with an Honours Degree in Business Administration.


In his role Marc is tasked with continuing the successes of Schneider Electric’s Secure Power Division, which provides integrated power, cooling and software solutions for data centres, server rooms and Edge Computing installations throughout the UK.


Since joining Schneider Electric, Marc has enjoyed a successful career in sales and marketing roles. He achieved double digit year-on-year growth in his first position as a regional sales engineer after completing the company’s graduate


training programme. Subsequently, he has gone on to repeat that level of performance to build a strong track record as National Sales Manager for the company’s Cable Management product line, and as National Sales Director for the Specification and Infrastructure Business - where he managed a team of 16 running the business pipeline.


98 IFHE DIGEST 2020


©Gorodenkoff Productions OU


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