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ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN


BURKHARD MUSSELMANN – MANAGING PRINCIPAL AND HEALTHCARE ARCHITECT, STANTEC, UK BRENDA BUSH-MOLINE – HEALTHCARE DESIGN LEAD AND SENIOR PRINCIPAL, STANTEC, US


Cultural diversity in healthcare design


Burkhard Musselmann and Brenda Bush-Moline discuss the need to consider cultural diversity in the healthcare design process, and suggest ways in which this can be achieved, drawing on cultural reference points of Stantec healthcare projects worldwide.


Healthcare design best practice has changed dramatically over the past 50 years. While a priority focus remains on efficiency for both operational management and patient care, today’s design best practice is also focused on the journey and experience of patients, families/companions, and the care provider team. This has promoted a much more holistic approach to designing for wellbeing, rather than concentrating on treatment regimes alone. So, what does this mean in real terms?


The Stantec-designed South West Acute Hospital in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, has 210 inpatient and 22 day case beds, and delivers a wide range of services to patients from Fermanagh and Tyrone ‘and beyond’.


Burkhard Musselmann


An architect with nearly 20 years’ experience in designing, documenting, and managing a wide range of healthcare projects, Burkhard Musselmann is now playing a vital role in the operations of the Stantec London office, as managing principal. Since joining Stantec in 2003, he has completed an MSc in Construction and


Project Management at the Queen’s University Belfast. During his studies he carried out extensive research into the delivery of


Public-Private Partnership (PPP) healthcare projects in the UK. He specialises in the management and execution of large, complex healthcare projects, and leads multidisciplinary design teams through all stages of the design – from inception to completion – both in the UK and internationally. The wide range of projects in his portfolio includes the South West Acute Hospital in Northern Ireland, which has won 11 design and sustainability awards.


Brenda Bush-Moline


Brenda Bush-Moline AIA, LEED AP, EDAC, is a Vice President and US Health Sector leader at Stantec, ‘a global services firm


committed to improved health for our communities’. With a focus on health and wellness, she says she is ‘inspired to


translate design and planning intentions into architecture that reflects the mission and vision of the client organisations she


serves’ – with her ‘immersive, experience-based approach to design and planning’ resulting in authentic and effective solutions. She is currently contributing to innovative planning for clients include Geisinger


Health and Jefferson Health. She has practised architecture for over 25 years, is a licensed architect, serves on the Advisory Board for the Healthcare Facilities


Symposium, is an ASHE member, and holds evidence-based design accreditation and certification status with the Center for Health Design.


IFHE DIGEST 2020


In the interests of patient dignity, we have relinquished ‘mixed’ male and female wards, and moved to models with private en-suite rooms, where patients can benefit from increased privacy and improved sleep, while hospital managers and clinical teams are better able to address infection control challenges. Arranging accommodation by condition and treatment type, rather than age and gender, has delivered operational benefits for hospitals, and simplified the treatment journey for patients, helping to make the experience of illness or injury, and treatment and recovery, less stressful. Interestingly, this creation of single room environments has now challenged notions of socialisation and the effects of isolation. A current focus is the balance of care protocols, infection control, operational efficiency, and environments that support a social network, and cultural influencers will be a key driver in this conversation. Therefore, patient demographics,


social factors, individual preferences, and the cultural and religious influences that define whether an environment is suitable for an individual, have sometimes been overlooked. While better healthcare design has made a significant contribution to improved patient comfort, treatment outcomes, and operational efficiency, the question remains whether true patient wellbeing is being factored into a hospital project if the cultural needs of some of its users are not being met.


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