search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
LIGHTING


inspired by the Nightingale model, being rectangular, with high ceilings and windows spanning across the perimeter.


Thermal and light comfort in hospital environments To define the levels of thermal comfort, the adaptive comfort concept is used, as defined by ASHRAE 55-2010, and achieved through computer simulation with DesignBuilder software. This model sets the temperature limits in which it is possible to ensure thermal comfort for up to 90% of patients; since, according to Fanger (1972), there will always be a percentage of dissatisfied patients, despite best efforts. (see Fig 2)


Daylight and chronobiology Fonseca (2007), Martau (2009) and a number of other authors have outlined the benefits of natural light utilisation in buildings and its relationship with human health and well-being. Rea (2011) points out that the Circadian Rhythm is intrinsically linked to light, and is dependent on the quantity, spectrum, spatial distribution and exposure time. The circadian light (CLA) and stimulus (CS) are key features that typify the spectral sensitivity of the human circadian rhythm. The graph depicted on Figure 4 relates


to the measurement of melatonin nocturnal suppression. The scale of circadian stimulus in different levels of photopic illuminance are also shown (Figuero and Rea, 2017). As we become familiar with the light


conditions of an environment, we can apply the evaluation models for the influence of light on the circadian rhythm, for instance, CS metrics. This is made available by the Lighting Research Center (LCR) on the website: https://www.lrc.rpi.edu/cscalculator/. To use the CS calculator, it is necessary


to know the illuminance at eye level and the light sources used in the studied environment. The second step is to enter data related to the spectral distribution of


41˚F


32˚C 30˚C 28˚C 26˚C 24˚C 22˚C 20˚C 18˚C 16˚C 14˚C


5˚C 10˚C 15˚C 20˚C 50˚F 59˚F 68˚F 77˚F


Table 1. Architectural features. Architectural features


Location


Inauguration Floors Beds


Constructed area Typology


Structure


Description


•Rio de Janeiro/RJ/Brazil •1929 •4


•236 •12,500.00 m²


•Transition between pavillion-based and monoblock hospital.


•Sheet Vinyl Flooring, walls and roof slab painted white


Partitioning of the building plan •Span separated by 1.80 m partition walls. Ward size


Number of beds in 9th ward Implantation


Opening features


•Southwest-northeast (larger facades) •Southeast-northwest (minor facades)


•Typology: 1 metre wide x 2.91 metre high. •Opening capacity: 100% •Positioning: openings in all facades, promoting crossed ventilation


•Shape: vertical •Protection: 10% of each frame provides permanent ventilation due to the use of fixed blinds


Other elements of


capture/exhaustion Predominant wind Lighting features


•No •South


•Linear fluorescent fixtures with capacity for 4 32 W x 4000 k tube lamps


the light sources. The concept of daylight autonomy


(DA) is defined as the percentage of the year in which working illuminance on a work plane is reached without the need of artificial light, thus being an important


86˚F 95˚F Ward 3D model


90% acceptability limits 80% acceptability limits


86.0˚F 82.4˚F 78.8˚F 75.2˚F 71.6˚F 68.0˚F 64.4˚F 60.8˚F


25˚C Mean monthly outdoor air temperature


Figure 2. Acceptable operating temperature for naturally conditioned environments. (Source: ASHRAE 55).


IFHE DIGEST 2020


Figure 3. Daylight Autonomy (DA) and Circadian Stimulus (CS) applied to a ward model.


79 30˚C 35˚C


Daylight Autonomy LICASO


CS calculator Circadian Stimulus sDA – ASE – UDI metrics using CS photopic illuminance set-up


premise in architectural plans. The Illuminating Engineering Society’s


standard on lighting measurements (LM 83-12) proposes the use of spatial daylight autonomy (sDA) and annual sunlight exposure (ASE) as metrics for evalutating


•Depth: 18.37 m •Width: 7.65 m •Length: 4.36 m •15 beds


Indoor operative catalogue


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106