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HEALING ENVIRONMENTS


Proposal C for the integration of evidence-based design guidelines for a hospital room.


l It is associated with decreased heart rate and systolic pressure.


Room proposals According to the evidence-based design guides, three room proposals were created, in which the scientific information obtained was integrated and where the elements of colour, lighting and nature can be combined in the same space, with the intention of reducing psychological symptoms such as stress and anxiety, as well as reducing pain perceived in patients.


Conclusion The research hypothesis of this project was confirmed, in which empirical evidence was found on the effects of environmental characteristics on the physical and psychological experience of patients of health institutions. A good choice of colours, creative design, combined with the use of textures or patterns and optimum lighting, can reduce levels of stress, anxiety, depression and levels of pain.


In addition, hospitals require a design with the integration of a more friendly range of colours, to break the image of institutionalisation and give the perception of being a comfortable and homely space. The analysis of the results emphasises the importance of installing natural or artificial light sources that can be manipulated, in terms of direction and intensity of light, both by patients and by work personnel, since light must be provided at varying intensities during the day.


Ultimately, it is necessary to continue


with more research work, focused on the target population, in order to identify the needs of the architectural and design type that can have a greater psychological and physical effect according to their age and/ or pathology group. The evidence-based design guides are


a good tool to help the recovery process and reduce hospital stay. To continue with


84 Architectural floor of room C.


this type of search will allow the creation of a catalogue of multidisciplinary tools that help create design guides based on scientific evidence, to improve the patient’s experience, hospital stay and levels of well-being.


References 1 Aragonés J, Amérigo M. (2010). Psicología ambiental. 3ra Edición. Editorial Pirámide. España.


2 Amérigo M. (2002). A psychological approach to the study of residential satisfaction. Residential environments: Choice, satisfaction, and behavior. 81-99. España: Bergin and Garvey Westport.


3 Kasali A, Nersessian NJ. (2014). El diseño basado en la evidencia : un análisis temático. Revista de Arquitectura 2014 ; 18 (26): 4-10. doi:10.5354/0719-5427.2014.32536.


4 Hernández R, Fernández C, Baptista P.


(2014). Investigation methodology. 6th edn. McGrawHill. Mexico.


IFHE


5 Beukeboom C, Langeveld D, Dijkstra K. Stress-reducing effects of real and artificial nature in a hospital waiting room. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine 2012: 18 (4): 329-33.


6 Cedeno-Laurent JG, Williams A, MacNaughton P et al. Building evidence for health: Green buildings, current science, and future challenges. Annual Review of Public Health 2018; 39 (1): 291-308.


7 de Dios JG. (2001, January). From evidence- based medicine to evidence based on medicine. In: Annals of Pediatrics (Vol. 55, No. 5, pp. 429-39). Elsevier Doyma.


8 Robinson PS, Green J. Ambient versus traditional environment in pediatric emergency department. Health Environments Research & Design Journal 2015; 8 (2): 71-80.


9 Lambert V, Coad J, Hicks P, Glacken M. Young children’s perspectives of ideal physical design features for hospital-built environments. Journal of Child Health Care 2014; 18 (1): 57–71.


10 Tinner M, Crovella,P, Rosenbaum PF. Perceived importance of wellness features at a cancer center: patient and staff perspectives. HERD 2018; 11 (3): 80-93.


11 Sagha Zadeh R, Eshelman P, Setla J, Kennedy L, Hon E, Basara A. Environmental design for end-of-life care: An integrative review on improving the quality of life and managing symptoms for patients in institutional settings. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 2018; 55 (3): 1018-34.


12 Norton-Westwood, D. The health-care environment through the eyes of a child- Does it soothe or provoke anxiety? International Journal of Nursing Practice 2012; 18 (1): 7–11.


13 Olmedo-Canchola VH. How does evidence- based medicine help in clinical practice? Family Care 2013; 20 (3): 98-100.


14 Water T, Wrapson J, Tokolahi E, Payam S, Reay S. Participatory art-based research with children to gain their perspectives on designing healthcare environments. Contemporary Nurse 2017; 53 (4): 456-73.


IFHE DIGEST 2020


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