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RISK MANAGEMENT


l Keep technical areas tidy, always close the door.


l Prevent risk of falling, keep corridors free of ceiling panels, loose cables, etc.


l Keep the working environment organised and clean; avoid spreading of dust and debris in the hospital.


l Restrict access to the construction site for unauthorised people; take care of signs.


l Request a ceiling permission when the ceiling will be opened for more than one day.


l Request a fire permission when grinding, welding, flame cutting, burning off of paint, etc (except in workshops)


l What to do in case of fire? l Be recognisable, wear your badge and uniform, register yourself at the services.


l Keep dangerous tools and products away from children and other vulnerable patients. Keep your work cart locked.


l In doubt, ask for advice of your supervisor.


This work has been in progress for ten years and, today, our staff fully understand how to make the risk assessments required for a hospital. This includes risks originating from maintenance control, as well as risks relating to the construction works, during work conducted by our own staff, as well as tasks performed by contractors relating to renovation, building and technical equipment.


Energy security and safety With regards to energy management, the technical facilities team have planned for high redundancy and high reliability. This is combined with a keen focus on sustainability and energy efficiency. The health science campus


Gasthuisberg has a consumption of: l 64,300,000 kWh of electricity (the equivalent of 15,000 residences)


l 82,000,000 kWh of gas for heating (the equivalent of 3,600 residences) of water (the equivalent of


l 333,000 m3 3,300 residences)


In relation to energy continuity, the most important energy source that must be secured is electricity. There is a double network operating on 10,000 V. The hospital has a “normal” distribution network, feeding from the external energy distributor, and a second “emergency” network. When an incident occurs with the external distribution, power is switched to the emergency network and a set of four diesel generators take over within 15 seconds, providing electricity for the most mission critical patient areas. In normal conditions, the hospital has a peak use of 12 MW and, in emergency


IFHE DIGEST 2020


conditions, it can supply a maximum of 4 x 2 MW. For the most essential uses, the hospital has a distributed network of UPS (uninterruptable power supply) systems to support the lighting and medical equipment in the operating theatres, for example. These backup systems are tested every month. However, once a year, a live test is also performed by asking the energy supplier to cut power to the hospital for five minutes.


Heating For heating, the hospital uses a centralised boilerroom with four boilers (with a total of 40 MW heating capacity). To secure this, we have mixed-burners which can work on oil and gas.


Gases


Medical gases, like compressed air and oxygen, are crucial for life support of some patients. Medical gases are regulated by pharmaceutical laws in Belgium and in Europe, and there is a long list of stringent rules that have to be followed. The most important rules are to ensure the right gas is supplied and to receive delivery from three separate sources – always under hygienic conditions.


Water


Although Belgium has an extensive network of water supply, the challenge is to ensure water is delivered to the patient at the optimum quality. Water is very important for haemodialysis and sterilisation. For these applications, water is treated by reverse osmosis, so that the quality of the water is guaranteed. For drinking water, the law is very


strict. In our hospital, only patients with reduced immunity get water in bottles – the rest comes from external supply. To ensure sufficient water supply at all times, the hospital has a reservoir controlled by the external supplier, and the supply comes into the site in three separate ways. All the new water pipes for both cold and hot water are insulated so the temperature is correct, measured and alarmed. Water tests are performed every month at 100 points, chosen by experts.


Air quality For operating theatres and cleanrooms for pharmaceutical use, clean air is ensured through filtration, guaranteeing the quality of the air. Particle counting is performed every year on air samples, to ensure that the quantity of particles do not exceed the acceptable maximum.


The Ambulant Centre with its interior, right, and waiting area, below.


Mother & Child unit and entry hall. 75


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