search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FIRE SAFETY


combustible façade at Ground Level was recommended for removal due to proximity to vehicle parking spaces that cannot be permanently removed. In Cases 1 and 2, all of the combustible façade was proposed to be removed. This is largely due to the high number of non-ambulant occupants inside. In Case 6, no façade removal is


necessary to lower the risk level. In the Stage 1 remediation, ignition sources such as vehicle parking spaces were removed from close proximity to the combustible façade installed on Level 1. In Stage 2, a new programmable fire detection and alarm system was recommended in order to remove the long delay between the alert tone and evacuation tone in the existing building.


Effects on other capital development projects It is important to note that the risk arising from combustible façade has potential to impact not only current hospital operations, but future capital development works as well.


In Case 1, the hospital had a planned


capital development project, which included installation of solar panels on the roof of the acute care building. The planning, funding, approval and installation for this project were obtained


Once determined, recommendations for remediation can be made to lower the fire risk using a special purpose framework


and completed prior to identification of the combustible cladding. The system was installed and de-energised for several months while a risk assessment and risk mitigation measures were carried out. In Case 4, cladding was identified in an


acute care building, which was designed to form the podium levels of a much taller tower, expected to be constructed in the future. The risk assessment outcome indicated a ‘low’ risk rating due to the current building being largely unoccupied. Future works planned for this building is expected to affect the risk rating. This may have significant impact on the final design of the building.


Conclusion The risk assessment process discussed in this paper – from the initial identification of potentially at-risk buildings, to identifying possible ignition sources, estimating the likelihood of different fire scenarios and determining the façade fire risk – can be used to address the combustible façade risk. Once the risk


is determined, recommendations for remediation can be made to lower the fire risk using a special purpose framework. The framework for fire risk assessment


is recommended to enable risk to occupants and vital assets to be consistently assessed and either minimised or eliminated.


IFHE


References 1 Wigmore T. Evacuation of the ICU due to fire. The Intensive Care Society 2014, pp. 281-2.


2 White N, Delichatsios M, Ahrens M, Kimball A. Fire hazards of exterior wall assemblies containing combustible components. MATEC Web of Conferences, 2013.


3 Robinson R, Francis G. SFAIRP vs ALARP. Conference On Railway Excellence, Adelaide, 2014.


4 ABCB, International Fire Engineering Guidelines, Canberra, ACT: Australian Building Codes Board, 2005.


5 ABCB, NCC 2016 Building Code of Australia: Volume One (Amendment 1) - Class 2 to Class 9 Buildings, Canberra: The Australian Building Codes Board, 2016.


28


IFHE DIGEST 2020


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106