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INFECTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL PHIL BARSBY – DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, INTASTOP LTD, UK


Protecting key areas against HCAIs


An increased emphasis on protecting patients from healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) means that healthcare specifiers are demanding the best protection against bacteria. Phil Barsby explains how key areas can be easily protected and how long lasting benefits can be achieved.


Infection control across all elements of the healthcare sector is of prime importance but it is often underestimated how much the fabric of the building can play a significant part in this. The face of healthcare in the UK is changing and is something that is documented often, particularly with regards to infection. How facilities are managed and which products are chosen can offer the first line of protection for patients and staff against the risk of infection, and we believe it is something that all elements of the healthcare sector should be exploring, from local surgeries to flagship NHS and private hospitals.


Hospital admissions and infection control Hospital admissions are on the rise, and not just during the winter months when it becomes a hot topic in the media. According to the UK’s Hospital Admitted Patient Care Activity Report 2017-18,1


the


number of Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) has undergone a marked increase. FCE (Finished Consultant Episode),


a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant, was at 20 million during the period, an increase of 1.5% from the previous year, and a staggering 30.3% increase from 10 years ago.


Door protection can help tackle infection transmission. FAE (Finished Admission Episode),


the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider, saw a reported figure of 16.6 million; a 0.5% increase from the previous year and a 23.3% increase from the period 2007/8. This shows how the necessary


attendance at hospital continues to rise and why minimising the spread of HCAIs wherever possible is essential. Clearly, sterile procedures are adhered to in


Phil Barsby


Phil Barsby is Director of Business Development for Intastop Ltd. He has been with the company for over 16 years, starting out as Sales Director, then appointed as Director of Business Development in 2013. He has been instrumental in the strategic direction that the company has taken, over the past ten years. The company’s


portfolio has evolved from its staple Aluminium Door Edge Guard product to expansion into new areas of the healthcare market, including the Door Top Alarm and Continuous Geared Hinge. Phil is also Treasurer on the board of the Design In Mental Health


Network; their core objective being: ‘The advancement of education concerning design in mental health settings, sharing good practice, promoting reflective design practice, gathering and disseminating evidence based research and raising awareness of the influence of design on mental wellbeing.’


IFHE DIGEST 2020


operating theatres, wards and clinics, but if infection control was applied to the wider building infrastructure, including doors, walls and handrails, even greater benefits could be enjoyed across all elements of the healthcare and care home sector. Take this principle a little further and


adopt a robust building infection control policy in all other associated healthcare buildings, such as GP surgeries, dental practices, minor injury units and even care homes, and the management of bacterial, transferrable infections could be significantly decreased – perhaps making a real difference to the number of necessary hospital admissions. But how easy is this to achieve and what benefits could it deliver to your building?


Infection prevention and control within buildings Currently, there are no mandatory guidelines as to how NHS Trusts, dental practices, care homes and similar places equip their buildings with infection control materials such as antibacterial sheeting. However, we have seen a marked increase


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