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SUSTAINABILITY


may qualify for 100 per cent coverage. “We were awarded C$900,000 in


December 2017, which was exactly the dollar amount we were looking for,” explained Allan Kelly, who joined MSH exactly two years previously. “It was probably one of the best Christmas presents I’ve ever received.”


On track for completion The four projects were selected by MSH’s environment and sustainability committee, because of their potential to reduce energy consumption, and their ease of implementation. They include lowering air exchanges in operating rooms from 20 to six during unoccupied hours (11 pm to 7 am), which is estimated to save 950,000 kWh; reducing kitchen exhaust and ventilation; replacing existing fluorescent tubes (approximately 300) with on-demand LED lighting in areas that are lit ‘24-7’, and converting the hospital from an open loop to a closed loop water cooling system, which will increase resource efficiency and reduce operational costs, saving MSH C$60,000 a year in water alone. The first three projects have been


procured through an innovative process based on value, while the fourth has been obtained through a traditional procurement model solely based on price. Upon completion, MSH will become the energy services company, and manage these projects with its own resources, which will help keep costs down. “Each project will have a significant environmental impact,” Allan Kelly explained. “Take the kitchen exhaust fan, that sucks 15,000 cubic feet of air per minute out of the kitchen and pushes it outside,” he continued. “By installing smart technology, the speed of the exhaust fan will be reduced by 40 per cent when not in use. This will provide significant energy savings.”


Since opening its doors in 1990, ‘MSH’ has steadily raised its environmental performance and reduced its energy, water, and waste costs.


Hard work and dedication MSH’s ‘green’ programme, and the success it has achieved, would not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of its corporate services department, comprised of Facilities, Environmental services, Food services, Biomedical services, Patient transport, Security, and Waste management. These core services staff members not only implemented the strategies outlined by senior leaders, but also gave feedback and provided frontline insight into how the programme could be improved. For example, when MSH implemented


real-time building analytics five years ago, it was the Maintenance team that monitored and interpreted the results produced by the new software. As a result, there were many improvements made throughout the hospital, including clearing up scheduling irregularities, static pressure and fan speed optimisation in air-handling units, and resolving temperature sensor failures and unnecessary damper cycling. “Staff members (such as these) are the


eyes and ears of the hospital, and because they’re here 24-7, they know what works and what doesn’t,” Allan Kelly explained.


Markham Stouffville Hospital’s Allan Kelly and Elena Pacheco receiving the CHES Award from award sponsor Honeywell’s Luis Rodrigues (centre).


86


Raising awareness Employee buy-in has also played an important role in ensuring the success of the hospital’s sustainability strategy. MSH has taken a number of steps to raise awareness of, and engagement in, its green initiatives. This includes holding an annual ‘bike to work’ day, a spring hospital property clean-up event, and a Greening and Sustainability Expo to coincide with Earth Day. The ‘expo’ brings together external vendors, hospital partners and staff, physicians, and volunteers, to learn about how they can be more ‘green’ in


their day-to-day activities, and to celebrate the hospital’s ‘earthy-friendly’ achievements. “Employees play a crucial role in transforming sustainability strategy into a reality,” explained Allan Kelly. “If they’re on board and they feel accountable for the results, then this will effect positive change.”


Acknowledgement l This article originally appeared, entitled ‘A dose of green’, Canadian Healthcare Facilities, the official magazine of the Canadian Healthcare Engineering Society (CHES). IFHE Digest would like to thank the magazine’s Editor, the publisher, MediaEdge, and CHES for allowing its reproduction here.


‘LEEDing’ the way


When Markham Stouffville Hospital (MSH) embarked on a major expansion project nine years ago, it decided to not only to add a 385,000 ft2


building


to the existing hospital, but also to construct a central utility plant off site that supplies thermal energy, electricity, and emergency power, through Markham District Energy. This partnership with a community-based utility provider is not only unique – MSH is the first hospital in Ontario to embark on such an endeavour – but it is a great example of working with leaders in the industry to use energy more efficiently. The project was evaluated according to LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Canada new construction standards, earning 35 points towards MSH’s LEED silver designation, which it achieved in summer 2015.


IFHE DIGEST 2020


IFHE


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