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ADRIAN HALL – CEO, BRANDON MEDICAL, UK INTEGRATED THEATRES


Building integrated theatres for the future


Adrian Hall discusses the increasing demand for intelligent integration in hospital theatres and the challenges of future-proofing solutions to accommodate robotic technologies and other clinical innovations – even before they have been invented.


There are some key challenges facing health estates teams as theatre technology advances. In particular, there are increasing demands around integration and control for operating theatres. The next generation of surgical robots are ready to enter the market (or already have), and their design has been guided by the needs of patients, surgeons and surgical teams. It is now the task of health estates managers and engineers to seamlessly and effortlessly integrate these technologies. The operating theatre environment has


dramatically changed: minimally invasive surgery means that more equipment has to be integrated and controlled than before, with complex audio-video solutions required, in addition to medical IT, UPS, gases and specialised carts. Against this backdrop, health estates managers and engineers are facing challenges in integrating the new technologies, while having to build in efficiencies – such as flexible use of operating theatres, instead of fixed, dedicated specialisms; all the while having to implement compliance such as HTM 06-01 (in the UK) and other regulatory and recommendatory requirements, which continuously and rapidly change. The sheer number of variables


increases the risk associated with any operating theatre project. Compounding on the complexity of the project, the solutions need to be future proof, flexible


The complete Brandon Medical integrated theatre equipment package.


in order to allow for various building management system platforms and development of new technologies, while delivering a user-friendly interface for the clinical staff. Engineers cannot and should not be required during surgical procedures for troubleshooting. Hospitals are moving from simple


operating theatres, to complex multi- media smart rooms, featuring complex,


Adrian Hall


Adrian Hall became a Chartered Engineer and member of the IET after achieving his first class Masters degree in Production Engineering and Production Management from Nottingham University. In 1991, Adrian joined the Unilever management development programme with the Brooke Bond, Batchelors and Van den Bergh food


companies acting in roles including Production and Logistics Manager, Project Manager and Advanced Manufacturing


Manager. Currently Chief Operating Officer at Brandon Medical and Export Champion for Northern Powerhouse UK, Adrian has


in-depth knowledge of both new technologies, as well as challenges faced by Health Estate Managers worldwide.


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interconnected technologies. However, one of the difficulties for theatre projects is that investment in many new technologies is clinically led. The MedTech businesses are clinically focussed and, therefore, not inclined to integrate their technologies with building engineering, and there is poor uptake of smart building technologies. At the same time, leaders in smart


infrastructure and Internet of Things (IoT) are cautious when it comes to engaging with hospitals and the operating theatre. Nevertheless, it is crucial to bring both clinical and engineering demands together for a successful project and this integration is highly complex – it is important to avoid islands of technology and islands of knowledge. Expertise in providing integrated solutions is increasingly sought after, therefore. Brandon Medical, a UK-based


company, offers equipment packages for operating theatres and critical care areas, with advanced integration and


IFHE DIGEST 2020


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