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RF Electronics ♦ news digest aesthetic skin treatment.


They create multi-spot arrays for ophthalmic diagnostics, for collimating and shaping laser beams for surgical applications, and for imaging applications such as optical coherence tomography and scanning confocal microscopy.


Recent advances in near infrared (NIR) and mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) quantum cascade and fibre lasers in conjunction with new diagnostic and treatment approaches are placing new demands on microoptics for these applications.


These needs include a broad NIR - MWIR transmission, high numerical aperture (NA), and small form factor for minimally invasive applications.


Jenoptik´s Grayscale lithographically fabricated GaP microlenses and microlens arrays meet these demands with:


1) A broad wavelength range from 600 nm beyond 5 µm


2) A high refractive index of 3.1 allowing a single element lens or lens array with NA’s up to 0.85.


3) Complex surface shapes providing for beam collimation and circularization of high divergence diode lasers with a single element.


Scanning confocal microscopy and minimally invasive optical coherence tomography are two examples where a single GaP microlens or microlens array can be used to extend the wavelength range over traditional GRIN and silicon lenses.


Jenoptik’s says it fabricates complex aspheric elements with high numerical aperture also provide for better imaging performance when compared with GRIN lens based systems.


What’s more, standard manufacturing processes are available for a range of different optical materials such as SiO2, GaAs, CaF2, Al2O3, ZnS, ZnSe, Ge, and chalcogenide glass.


“GaN is increasingly recognised as a key technology in bringing about improved efficiency and reducing overall systems costs. Cree and Acal BFi have joined forces to accelerate bringing this advantage to a wider market” says Tom Dekker, World Sales and Marketing Director for RF Technology at Cree.


“Acal BFi has an excellent reputation with a strong technical team able to support this specialised technology. This agreement further strengthens a sales network that has built a reputation for excellence in customer support. We look forward to accelerating adoption of Cree GaN HEMT as the RF technology of choice throughout Europe,” adds Dekker.


“A partnership with the leading innovator in the key area of GaN RF allows Acal BFi to increase its offer of advanced solutions at the very forefront of technology. Acal BFi’s experienced engineering team across Europe provides our customers with the design support and product knowledge needed to take advantage of this innovative technology,” concludes Lee Austin, Business Development Director, Acal BFi Communications Division.


RF Electronics Cree and Acal BFi to increase


GaN RF sales in Europe The LED and gallium nitride RF specialist and design and engineering innovator are uniting to accelerate the adoption of Cree’s RF technology


Cree and Acal BFi have signed a franchise agreement to increase the sale of Cree RF components in Italy, Spain, Germany, Poland, Czech Republic, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Hungary and Luxembourg.


Acal BFi was founded through its design expertise and engineering knowledge. The firm works closely with its suppliers as a technical partner to help solve its’ customers design challenges.


March 2013 www.compoundsemiconductor.net 97


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