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Opel makes breakthrough with POET based n- and p-transistors


The result builds on the previous GaAs (gallium arsenide) based VCSEL milestone. It is a further verification that III-Vs can compete with silicon CMOS in WDM capable optoelectronic devices and functions, FETs and bipolar devices


Opel Technologies has achieved Milestone 4 in its Planar Optoelectronic Technology (POET), achieving radio frequency and microwave operation of both n-channel and p-channel transistors.


With this achievement, POET extends the capability of its unique monolithic platform to cover integration of a complete range of wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) capable optoelectronic devices and functions.


This is in addition to complementary electronics based on n-channel and p-channel transistors as either field effect transistors (FETs) or bipolar devices.


For this milestone, 3inch POET wafers fabricated at BAE Systems (Nashua, NH) yielded submicron n-channel and micron-sized p-channel transistors operating at frequencies of 42 GHz and 3 GHz respectively. These operating frequencies are expected to be improved even further in the short term to up to 300-350 GHz range for the n-channel device.


Peter Copetti, Executive Director of Opel, notes, “Following the success of our Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser milestone achieved recently, this result further verifies POET’s electronic and optical monolithic compatibility, a key advantage of POET as a silicon CMOS replacement. Our on-chip optical generation and detection capability is unique in the semiconductor industry.”


Progress on Taylor’s work at the Opel lab had been delayed by damage sustained to key equipment during a multi-day power outage caused by Tropical Storm Sandy in late October 2012. However, the rebuild is expected to be completed next week, and the company expects the affected equipment will be recalibrated and operational again by the end of March 2013.


Copetti adds, “Given the calibre of the POET team, we are confident that the lost time will be made up so that it will not have a material impact on the milestone target dates.”


At the successful conclusion of the recent private placement fundraising, approximately $1.3 million in new capital equipment was ordered to upgrade the R&D facility capabilities. The company has completed all necessary site infrastructure upgrades and is awaiting the arrival of the new equipment.


Opel expects the new equipment will be installed, calibrated, and commissioned by the end of June, 2013.


By enabling increased speed, density, reliability, power efficiency, and much lower bill-of-materials and assembly costs, POET provides a new technology direction and opportunity for the semiconductor industry.


POET will allow continued advances of semiconductor device performance and capabilities for many years, overcoming the current power and speed bottlenecks of silicon-based circuits,. Opel believes it will change the future development roadmaps of a broad range of semiconductor applications including mobile devices, computer servers, storage arrays, imaging equipment, networking equipment, transportation systems, and test and measurement instruments.


Infinera’s 100Gb/s platform connects subsea


Mediterranean network The firm’s InP (indium phosphide) based DTN-X platform will provide links between Italy, Greece, Turkey, Israel and Cyprus


MedNautilus has deployed the Infinera DTN-X platform across the Mediterranean to increase capacity on its subsea network and deliver up to 100Gb/s international connectivity services.


The Mediterranean operations of the Telecom Italia Sparkle Group, MedNautilus, operates the largest protected submarine cable network in the Mediterranean connecting Italy, Greece, Turkey, Israel and Cyprus, and serves the growing capacity needs of the region.


The Infinera DTN-X solution enables MedNautilus to upgrade its network quickly in response to customers’ demands as the platform simplifies the management of long-haul terrestrial and submarine networks.


“MedNautilus now operates the first submarine cable network in Europe able to provide up to 100Gb/s international connectivity services with a solution that ensures top quality and efficiency standards,” says Mario Pirro, Sparkle’s EVP Technology.


“The market in the region is demanding faster and more advanced services and with the Infinera DTN-X solution for the provision of 100Gb/s services, we are able to provide the capacity we need in order to meet the fast growing requirements of our customers throughout the markets covered by our backbone.”


“We are pleased that MedNautilus selected us to build out one of the regions fastest growing networks,” comments Chris Champion, VP EMEA Sales for Infinera. “The simplicity of the DTN-X allows us to upgrade any backbone quickly, enabling our customers to deploy services faster while offering outstanding reliability.”


Infinera says its DTN-X platform is the first to deliver up to 500 Gb/s long-haul super-channels based on Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) and the FlexCoherent Processor, scaling transport capacity without scaling operational complexity. With coherent long haul reach for submarine links, the Infinera


March 2013 www.compoundsemiconductor.net 89


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