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industry  GaN power electronics Key features of the GaN-on-silic


The leading group of seven vendors (identified in red circles in figure 2) currently focuses on discrete power devices and modules for power conversion applications.


 International Rectifier (IRF), which leads the time-to- commercialization race, is driven by a strong motive — re-entry into the high-voltage power arena. The company is reinforcing its lead with a comprehensive portfolio of patents and patent applications.


 Efficient Power Conversion (EPC) remains the only vendor offering commercial-grade, E-mode GaN-on-silicon HEMTs for power conversion applications in the open merchant market.


 Transphorm focuses on application-specific modules. It leverages RF power GaN-on-SiC device technology developed at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Cree, which has assigned its high-voltage GaN power device patents and patent applications to Transphorm.


 Fujitsu Semiconductor announced its commercialization effort in November 2012. The company leverages its legacy leadership in RF power GaN technology for power conversion applications. It invented the HEMT and led commercialization of RF power GaN technology by forming Eudyna in 2004.


 Sanken Electric focuses on high voltage GaN-on-silicon power HEMTs for use in power conversion applications, such as power supplies, at both the component and system level. It leverages LED manufacturing expertise and more than a decade of R&D efforts in GaN HEMT technology.


 MicroGaN is building on its legacy, GaN-based sensor and actuator technology. It is a member of the German NeuLand programme and it is in a close relationship with Infineon.


 Infineon is leading two major German programmes related to GaN technology—NeuLand and HiPo. Through this it has established a 150 mm GaN-on-silicon processing pilot line in Villach, Austria. Infineon and STMicroelectronics essentially share a market duopoly in super-junction MOSFETs. Therefore, Infineon’s commercialization motive and strategy tends to be, in contrast to IRF, of a defensive nature. As a result, Infineon’s position on the commercialization timeline lags the leading vendors featuring offensive strategies.


38 www.compoundsemiconductor.net March 2013


The second group consists of eigh circles in figure 2), most of which a GaN devices.


 HRL Laboratories leverages its automotive power conversion ap chargers for electric vehicles. Ge


 Panasonic is looking to build on power conversion applications, i and uninterruptible power suppli demonstrated the first monolithic inverter circuit.


 STMicroelectronics (STM) ente technology arena by licensing Ve manufacturing technology. Howe on SiC devices.


 RF Micro Devices’ efforts to com power conversion applications re legacy RF power business.


 Toshiba leverages its RF power GaN-on-silicon technology devel its central corporate research ce


 GaN Systems is a start-up estab government to develop GaN-on- conversion applications.


 NXP Semiconductors leverages co-developing high-voltage, GaN 200 mm wafers with A*STAR Res


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