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Solar ♦ news digest


“Some Swiss scientists announced that they had achieved this, but scientists at the conference had a hard time believing it,” says NREL senior scientist Jun-Wei Luo, one of the co-authors of the study.


Luo got to work constructing a quantum-dot-in-nanowire system using NREL’s supercomputer and was able to demonstrate that despite the fact that the overall band edges are formed by the gallium arsenide core, the thin aluminium-rich barriers provide quantum confinement both for the electrons and the holes inside the aluminium-poor quantum dot. That explains the origin of the highly unusual optical transitions.


Several practical applications are possible. The fact that stable quantum dots can be placed very close to the surface of the nanometres raises a huge potential for their use in detecting local electric and magnetic fields. The quantum dots also could be used to charge converters for better light-harvesting, as in the case of photovoltaic cells.


This work is described in detail in the paper, “Self-assembled Quantum Dots in a Nanowire System for Quantum Photonics,” by M. Heiss et al in Nature Materials, (2013). DOI:10.1038/ nmat3557


The team of scientists working on the project came from universities and laboratories in Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, and the United States.


First Solar’s new VP takes a


shine to the Middle East The CdTe (cadmium telluride) solar cell manufacturer is branching out in this region with the new appointment of ex GE executive, Ahmed Nada


First Solar has announced that Ahmed Nada will join the company as Vice President of Business Development for the Middle East. He will report to Christopher Burghardt, Vice President of Business Development for Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA).


Ahmed Nada, , First Solar VP of Business Development for the Middle East


In this new role, Nada will be based in the company’s Dubai office and will lead business development activities in the region outside of Saudi Arabia, where the company is also establishing operations.


Ahmed Nada has 20 years of experience throughout the Middle East, concentrated in the energy and power industries. He joins First Solar after 14 years with General Electric. He most recently was the business executive and regional general manager of GE Oil & Gas Global Services in the Middle East.


Prior to that Nada worked at Zahid Tractors & Heavy Machinery Co, a Caterpillar distributor in Saudi Arabia, and Saudi Arabian Marketing Corp. (SAMACO).


“The Middle East is just beginning to tap its immense potential solar power generation, and Ahmed’s many years of experience working with the region’s leading energy companies will help us to meet the growing demand for renewable energy in the region,” says Christopher Burghardt.


“Utility-scale solar power offers a compelling solution to the region’s growing energy needs, and this is a great opportunity to leverage First Solar’s proven technology and global experience to provide the best value to our customers here,” adds Nada.


Ahmed Nada holds a Master’s of Science degree in international management from HEC Lausanne University in Switzerland.


Flisom secures funding to ramp up 15 MW CIGS production plant


Apart from securing financial backing, the firm has been awarded by Empa, an unnamed Swiss investor and the firm’s


March 2013 www.compoundsemiconductor.net 105


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