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industry  LEDs


Slashing the cost of solid-state lighting


How can LED epiwafer costs fall to a level that can spur mass adoption of solid-state lighting? By turning to growth on 200 mm silicon substrates, loaded into a multi-wafer MOCVD reactor featuring advanced thermal management and optimised wafer recesses,argues Aixtron’s Boerge Wessling.


T


he GaN-on-silicon LED is having a resurgence. It was a hot topic several years’ ago, and it is well and truly back in the limelight, with LED chipmakers now developing manufacturing processes for producing devices on this platform. If they succeed, they will slash the cost of this solid-state emitter. According to market analysts, switching from LED production on 100 mm sapphire, a common platform today, to 150 mm or 200 mm silicon should lead to substantial savings in the high double-digit level.


40 www.compoundsemiconductor.net March 2013


Slashing the cost of the LED promises to drive a hike in the sales of bulbs based on this technology. This is only possible, however, if a stable, reproducible epitaxy technology is available that enables LEDs grown on silicon to deliver similar levels of performance to those on the market today.


Recent announcements indicate that there are no longer major concerns regarding the brightness and efficacy of LEDs grown on


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