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Novel Devices ♦ news digest up to 300-350 GHz range for the n-channel device.


Peter Copetti, Executive Director of Opel, notes, “Following the success of our Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser milestone achieved recently, this result further verifies POET’s electronic and optical monolithic compatibility, a key advantage of POET as a silicon CMOS replacement. Our on-chip optical generation and detection capability is unique in the semiconductor industry.”


Progress on Taylor’s work at the Opel lab had been delayed by damage sustained to key equipment during a multi-day power outage caused by Tropical Storm Sandy in late October 2012. However, the rebuild is expected to be completed next week, and the company expects the affected equipment will be recalibrated and operational again by the end of March 2013.


Copetti adds, “Given the calibre of the POET team, we are confident that the lost time will be made up so that it will not have a material impact on the milestone target dates.”


At the successful conclusion of the recent private placement fundraising, approximately $1.3 million in new capital equipment was ordered to upgrade the R&D facility capabilities. The company has completed all necessary site infrastructure upgrades and is awaiting the arrival of the new equipment.


Opel expects the new equipment will be installed, calibrated, and commissioned by the end of June, 2013.


By enabling increased speed, density, reliability, power efficiency, and much lower bill-of-materials and assembly costs, POET provides a new technology direction and opportunity for the semiconductor industry.


POET will allow continued advances of semiconductor device performance and capabilities for many years, overcoming the current power and speed bottlenecks of silicon-based circuits,. Opel believes it will change the future development roadmaps of a broad range of semiconductor applications including mobile devices, computer servers, storage arrays, imaging equipment, networking equipment, transportation systems, and test and measurement instruments.


Connecting indium


antimonide quantum dots A novel spin technique has allowed scientists to move closer to creating what they say is the first viable high-speed quantum computer


Recent research offers a new spin on using nanoscale semiconductor structures to build faster computers and electronics. Literally.


University of Pittsburgh and Delft University of Technology researchers have revealed a new method that better preserves the units necessary to power lightning-fast electronics, known as qubits (pronounced CUE-bits).


The scientists explored InSb (indium antimonide) quantum dots Graphic displaying spin qubits within a nanowire


“Spins are the smallest magnets in our universe. Our vision for a quantum computer is to connect thousands of spins, and now we know how to control a single spin,” Frolov adds. “In


March 2013 www.compoundsemiconductor.net 135 in their study.


Hole spins, rather than electron spins, can keep quantum bits in the same physical state up to ten times longer than before, a new report by the scientists, finds.


“Previously, our group and others have used electron spins, but the problem was that they interacted with spins of nuclei, and therefore it was difficult to preserve the alignment and control of electron spins,” says Sergey Frolov, assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy within Pitt’s Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, who did the work as a postdoctoral fellow at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands.


Whereas normal computing bits hold mathematical values of zero or one, quantum bits live in a hazy superposition of both states. It is this quality, said Frolov, which allows them to perform multiple calculations at once, offering exponential speed over classical computers. However, maintaining the qubit’s state long enough to perform computation remains a long-standing challenge for physicists.


“To create a viable quantum computer, the demonstration of long-lived quantum bits, or qubits, is necessary,” continues Frolov. “With our work, we have gotten one step closer.”


The holes within hole spins, Frolov explains, are literally empty spaces left when electrons are taken out. Using extremely thin filaments called InSb nanowires, the researchers created a transistor-like device that could transform the electrons into holes.


They then precisely placed one hole in a nanoscale box called “a quantum dot” and controlled the spin of that hole using electric fields. This approach - featuring nanoscale size and a higher density of devices on an electronic chip - is far more advantageous than magnetic control, which has been typically employed until now, notes Frolov.


“Our research shows that holes, or empty spaces, can make better spin qubits than electrons for future quantum computers.”


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