This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
news digest ♦ Power Electronics


Brad as he continues to build on Bridgelux’s leadership in the solid state lighting industry.”


Prior to joining Bridgelux, Bullington held executive strategy, corporate and business development roles at Seagate Technology from 2006 to 2009.


Bullington held similar positions at Maxtor Corporation, where he was also a founding member of Maxtor’s Branded Products Group (BPG), an industry pioneer in the external storage solutions market.


Prior to entering the data storage industry, he was a management consultant for A.T. Kearney, where he served a range of clients focused on issues of strategy and operations in the software and technology hardware, aerospace, retail and financial services industries.


He began his professional services career at Deloitte & Touche.


Bullington received his B.A. in Business Administration, with a Certificate of International Studies in Business, from the University of Washington.


Mitsubishi Electric advances


SiC ingot processing The firms new technology improves productivity of silicon carbide slice processing for semiconductor wafers


SiC is expected to be used increasingly in power semiconductors due to its superior energy-saving and CO2 emissions-reduction properties compared to silicon.


Until now, sliced wafers have been produced through multi-wire saw with diamond particles because SiC is the third hardest compound on earth.


But this method requires lengthy machining time and large kerf widths.


The new parallel multi-wire electrical discharge machining method utilises Mitsubishi Electric’s proven electrical discharge technology for difficult-to-cut material, and employs a dedicated power supply specially developed for SiC.


-


The non-contact, thermal process-wire electrical discharge method slices faster and at closer intervals compared to contact cutting (220 microns or less cut at a speed of 80 microns per minute)


- More wafer slices extracted per SiC ingot for improved efficiency.


Power supply dedicated to SiC slice processing -


-


Simultaneous wire cuts with even energy enabled by 40 electrically independent power feed contacts to wire electrodes.


Uninterrupted processing with even very thin (0.1mm) wire electrodes thanks to a newly developed high-frequency power supply tailored to the characteristics of SiC material.


Pending patents for the technology number 22 in Japan and 10 overseas.


GaN devices market to soar at a CAGR of 18 percent


One of the key factors contributing to market growth in semiconductors is the high thermal conductivity of gallium nitride over other non-silicon substrates


The gallium nitride semiconductor devices market has been witnessing the increasing preference for GaN with different substrates.


However, the complexity in matching the cost and performance could pose a challenge to the growth of this market.


TechNavio’s report, the “Global Gallium Nitride Semiconductor Devices Market 2012-2016”, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts.


According to TechNavio, the key vendors dominating this market space are NXP, RFMD and Triquint.


New players include Plessey Semiconductor based in the UK.


The other vendors mentioned in the report are Nichia, Osram Opto, Royal Philips Electronics N.V. and Toyoda Gosei Co. Ltd.


The key technologies include


Simultaneous cutting of SiC ingots into 40 pieces -


Forty wire electrodes with a diameter of 0.1 mm aligned at 0.6mm intervals are rotated to cut 40 slices at once, improving productivity.


122 www.compoundsemiconductor.net March 2013


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143