This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Power Electronics ♦ news digest systems and more reliable end-products.


IGBTs have improved (higher current density, thinner and faster), as have SiC and GaN based devices.


GaN could be delayed in its market introduction, but SiC is already here and several companies showed SiC power module capabilities all last year.


Adoption of power stack is driving the modular approach across applications.


The Power Stack is the custom design and manufacturing of an inverter’s sub-unit which includes only the core components: power semiconductor module, cooling system, capacitors, resistors, current sensors, busbars and connectors.


Power Stack is the innovative sub-system of an inverter. Inverter and device makers are becoming power stack manufacturers for several reasons:


• Vertical integration


• Access to several applications, since power stacks are less application-dependent than inverters • Internal cost reductions • Access to high-end markets • Sustain R&D in-house


Large firms such as Ingeteam, Semikron or ABB are now involved, but power stack also interests smaller players such as AgileSwitch – former IGBT driver manufacturer – who are part of this about $500 million market.


Major changes are happening across the supply chain.


Power electronics often requires having several types of knowledge and experience gained know-how in mechanics, electronics, semiconductors, electrics, fluidics and hydraulics, and connectors. Therefore, development can be complicated and final products expensive.


Japanese and Chinese players, especially system makers, tend toward internal vertical integration and master the manufacturing processes of each sub-system and component.


In the case of Japanese companies, this tendency is mostly driven by cost reduction and absorption of intermediary margins, whereas Chinese companies want to access the technology and show some proof of quality.


William Watkins has moved up to Chairman of the Board of Directors, having served as CEO of the company from January, 2010 until taking this new role.


Bullington joined Bridgelux from Seagate in 2010, where he worked with Watkins, and has been responsible for the company’s overall business strategy and all corporate and market development activities. These include strategic partnerships and joint venture development, technology licensing, capital formation and the legal function. He also ran Bridgelux’s Technology Solutions business.


“Brad has driven Bridgelux’s strategic direction and corporate development initiatives since joining the Company when I came aboard,” says Watkins. “I look forward to working with him to ensure a smooth transition, as well as going forward as Bridgelux enters its next phase of growth.”


“Bill has restructured and recapitalised the company, nurtured and developed our leadership position in GaN on Silicon, and significantly strengthened Bridgelux’s position in the rapidly growing global lighting market,” adds Alan Salzman, CEO and Managing Partner of VantagePoint Capital Partners.


“The Board is thrilled that Bridgelux will continue to benefit from Bill’s tremendous knowledge, expertise, and guidance as the Company moves ahead. We also look forward to working with


March 2013 www.compoundsemiconductor.net 121


On the other hand, EU and US players are diversified and acquisition of new or complementary competencies (such as Mersen, Rogers or Power Integration) or high-end R&D and prototyping services (APEI, Primes, imec, GE Global Research) is becoming more common.


Bridgelux appoints Bradley


J. Bullington as CEO Also, Bill Watkins, who nurtured and developed GaN on Silicon will become chairman of the board of directors


Bridgelux has appointed Bradley J. Bullington, the company’s former Vice President, Strategy and Corporate Development and General Manager, Technology Solutions, as Chief Executive Officer.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143