search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Events


IAGA SUMMIT Macau 2018


John Hagan, IAGA Secretary, Partner with Harris Hagan, and Deputy Director of GamCare


John Hagan is recognised by the independent legal guides as a leading international gambling lawyer.


In 1993 he qualified and practised as a commercial litigator before specialising in gambling law from 1998. Furthermore he has advised many of the world’s largest gambling operators.


In addition, John is frequently instructed by other law firms, private equity firms and banks to provide specialist licensing and regulatory expertise in respect of corporate investments and transactions.


John is an experienced advocate, a frequent and respected conference speaker and a regular contributor of articles to national and international gaming publications. He is also secretary of the International Association of Gaming Advisors, a member of the International Masters of Gaming Law, Deputy Chairman of Gamcare, the leading problem gambling charity in the UK and Chairman of the Industry Group for Responsible Gambling.


In the UK we have very clear gambling advertising rules, but more fundamentally, the messaging to customers is about is making sure they make an informed choice when they gamble. The messaging should help them to increase their own self- awareness.


In his keynote address at the IAGA Summit, John Hagan will consider the social responsibility landscape in the UK and how industry, responsible gambling experts, academics, researchers and treatment providers can work together effectively to achieve meaningful change in live gambling environments. His comments will look at how the industry can engage openly with its customers in relation to responsible gambling, enable informed choice, improve self- awareness of their behaviour and create supportive environments. G3 took the opportuntity to interview Mr. Hagan ahead of his Macau Summit address


Should operators be accused of double standards by encourage play while stating that are promoting RG responsibly?


I think the main point is that advertising, marketing and responsibly gambling are not mutually inconsistent. Gambling is a mainstream leisure activity and in the UK operators are free to market their services on TV, online, through sponsorship and at premises etc. What matters is that the advertising and marketing, as well as the products themselves, are responsible. In the UK we have very clear gambling advertising rules, but more fundamentally, the messaging to customers is about making sure they make an informed choice when they gamble. Te messaging should help them to increase their own self-awareness.


One of the issues with responsible gambling messaging is that it’s viewed by the majority of the public as relating to someone else, so they ignore it.


P98 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE /MARKET DATA


Meanwhile, the problem gamblers don’t consider themselves to be problem gamblers, so they ignore it as well, which means there’s very few actually paying attention to all this messaging, which is clearly something that needs to be addressed.


Should the industry be asking for/commissioning compelling academic research to back-up the need to implement RG strategies?


Of course there needs to be academic research into responsible gambling and it needs to be evaluated and applied within the industry. However, commissioning and understanding research is not the industry’s strength. Operators find it complex and often inconclusive, especially when they’re looking to make a practical positive change. Operators roles shouldn’t be limited to simply funding the research, they need to be collaborating with researchers, giving them data and live experiences of how customers play as part of real operational insights. Without this collaboration


Responsible Gambling: Change, Collaboration and Innovation


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150