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Events


IAGA SUMMIT Macau 2018


Luc Delany, CEO, ISGA


Luc Delany is the CEO of the ISGA, the global trade body of the social games industry, which he founded in 2012. He is also CEO of Delany & Co, a technology public policy advisory. You may spot Luc on the news occasionally, discussing technology and social media. Luc is a former Policy Executive of Google and Facebook. He is a Fellow of the British American Project, and sits on the University of Maastricht External Advisory Board of the Faculty of Arts and Science.


We believe that we have done more than many industries to take a responsible approach through ongoing dialogue with regulators, research projects and the development of best practice. We have participated in countless regulatory inquiries into the sector. We believe there is a link between maintaining open dialogue with regulators - who are the guardians of consumer protection - and a better informed playing public.


Social Gaming Responsibility: the Industry’s ISGA Perspective


Featuring themes focused on everything from emoji, superheroes, characters from ancient civilisations, mythology and fairy tale legends, when does a social game theme cross the “age appropriate” line and appeal to underage gamers? G3 poses the questions to Luc Delany, the CEO and founder of the International Social Games Association (ISGA), who will be speaking on the panel in Macau


Has the industry done enough to explain the differences between gambling and social gaming to the playing public?


Almost anyone who plays social games understands they are not in it for the money. It tends to be those who don’t play and don’t understand the games that don’t understand the differences and why people play. It might help to start by setting out the key differences. Social casino is a genre that takes inspiration from well-known casino based games that are often found in real money casinos (such as slots) and delivers them in the innovative way in terms of social mechanics, design and gameplay that is typical of “social” or “casual games”. Te model for these games (e.g. social slots) is the same as it is for other popular freemium social games such as Clash of Clans and Candy Crush.


Games are based on the freemium-pricing model, which relies upon in-game advertising and/or in- game purchases to achieve revenue. Tere is no requirement to pay to play - as is typical of social


P94 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE /MARKET DATA


games, the vast majority never make an in-game purchase. Additionally, social casino games offer no real world prizes based on game play. Players can progress through the games “winning” virtual prizes that have no value outside of the game, such as virtual coins and other virtual items.


Te ISGA was established in 2012 by a group of leading social games companies to explain to the public, policy makers and regulators what the social games industry does, how it works and the value that it generates, both for the people who enjoy playing social games as well as for the digital economy.


We believe that we have done more than many industries to take a responsible approach through ongoing dialogue with regulators, research projects and the development of best practice. We have participated in countless regulatory inquiries into the sector. We believe there is a link between maintaining open dialogue with regulators - who are the guardians of consumer protection - and a better informed playing public.


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