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casino floors even though we believed the event was isolated and there were no threats of copycats.


INVESTIGATION After the Mandalay Bay shooting, the


Enforcement Division was activated to assist the investigating law enforcement agencies that had primary jurisdiction: Metro and the FBI. Tose two agencies moved immediately to begin a thorough investigation that has been well- publicised and documented in the media. Enforcement Division officers were directed to assist those agencies with whatever they needed, thus furthering the cooperative efforts detailed in the task force meetings that had been held over the years.


Since the shooter had booked a room at, and was in a gaming property, the Board worked with the licensee to get Metro and the FBI everything they needed. At the same time, the Enforcement Division conducted an investigation of its own into the shooter. In such a case, the regulatory agency, along with the licensee, may have records on a shooter or assailant that might be helpful to law enforcement.


Casino records, be they audit, hotel information, or even patron dispute information might be helpful even if irrelevant to the particular event. For example, casinos have databases and patron information that may include spending habits and even dining preferences or room requests that might go toward profiling an individual.


Casinos are required to have such high levels of surveillance that law enforcement can be assisted even if the event occurs off-property.


On Tuesday, September 6, 2011, a gunman with an AK-47 killed four people, and then himself,


at an IHOP restaurant in Carson City, Nevada. Te restaurant was located directly across the street from a licensed gaming property. Immediately after the shooting occurred, property staff and GCB Enforcement agents were able to use outside surveillance cameras at the property to gain video of the entire event. Tis greatly helped law enforcement investigating the crime.


If the event had occurred inside the casino, Board would have worked with any other agencies to investigate the crime or event. Board agents have access to everything the casino has, including surveillance tapes. Te fact that casinos have more surveillance that almost any other business is of comfort to all involved; events can be dissected and used for criminal proceedings, for example.


POST-EMERGENCY EMERGENCIES Perhaps the strangest part of the October 2017


tragedy was the mainstream and social media coverage of the event. Te media descended upon Las Vegas, and their reporting was swift and accurate. Social media, however, unleashed an onslaught of conspiracy theories and coverage that was not accurate.


While the Board was quietly working with law enforcement to gain as much information on the event as possible, phone lines became busy with calls on the shooting. Social media reports and statements were not a concern until the media began picking up on some of the proposed conspiracy theories that began to swirl. It was at this point that the GCB decided to quell some of the commentary by providing the media with information that could be publicly released and that might clarify some of the rumors.


Gaming licensees can hire outside PR or


damage control firms to assist them in limiting the amount of rumor and conspiracy speculation that swirls after such an event. Te regulators, if they speak, must do so not on behalf of the licensee, but of the state.


So, while it is not a customary job of the regulator to speak to the press on events of this nature, discretion should be used in doing so. Te state of Nevada depends heavily on tourism, and with several thousand gaming licensees’ business at stake, it is sometimes reassuring to them, the state, and the public that the regulator is calm and discussing points of fact, not speculation.


Rumors that harm the state or that serve to damage law enforcement investigations can sometimes be dealt with by a few facts released to the media.


CONCLUDING REMARKS Every regulator is working in a jurisdiction


where there may be some kind of crisis, or emergency. States must recognise that fact, and work with all responders, not just “first responders,” but also “potential responders,” including gaming regulators, is crucial. Tere should be a set of defined roles, along with communication lines set up; further, regular roundtable briefings and emergency preparedness exercises can be conducted.


Te regulators should have a part, whether it is to assist first responders when their manpower numbers are overwhelmed, or to potentially be the first responders themselves if an event occurs on casino’s premises. No emergency or crisis can be 100 per cent accurately planned for, but these things go a long way toward accomplishing the state’s goals of not only protecting its own citizens, but to protect tourists and casino visitors.


NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE /MARKET DATA P71


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