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Events


MONTE-CARLO EUROMAT Summit 2018


John White, Chief Executive, BACTA


John White is a trade association professional having worked in industries as diverse as meat rendering to baby products and garden furniture to timber. Prior to joining the Federation of Bakers as Director in May 2000, John spent 10 years in the amusement machine industry at Bacta, to which he returned as Chief Executive in July 2014. He believes trade associations are a vital part of the political culture and at their best are essential to good government.


Self-exclusion: Is it working and can you ensure it’s effective?


Self-exclusion is not a solution to their problem gambling, it’s not the only tool available to them, nor is it only thing they should do, but it is one arrow in the quiver of measures they can take to help themselves in their journey out of problematic behaviour. It is, therefore, right and proper that every sector of the gambling industry should offer an opportunity to whoever finds themselves in that position to exclude themselves from gambling.


During the self-exclusion panel at the EUROMAT Summit, panelists will disucss the proposition: ‘Is self-exclusion working and how do you manage it to be effective. Panelists include John White, Eduardo Antoja and Frits Huffnagel. Below, John White sets out his views on the topic and answers the question in full.


Yes - self-exclusion is working and is a valuable tool available to those that have acknowledged they have a problem with their gambling. It’s not a solution to their problem gambling, it’s not the only tool available to them, nor is it only thing they should do, but it is one arrow in the quiver of measures they can take to help themselves in their journey out of problematic behaviour. It is, therefore, right and proper that every sector of the gambling industry should offer an opportunity to whoever finds themselves in that position to exclude themselves from gambling.


Te way in which we accomplish this in the UK arcade sector, is that we have a database of all AGCs in the country; we know where they’re all located, who operates them and we know their postcodes, which is crucial. If someone wishes to self-exclude they simply walk into an AGC and ask to be self-excluded. Tis allows the arcade operator to instigate an intervention, whereby they privately discuss their behaviour and seek to sign-post the individual with care-agencies, including GambleAware, and assist with helpline numbers.


P38 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE /MARKET DATA


We ask for a self-exclusion form to be completed, which requires a photograph and a list of the arcades from which they will be excluded.


Te form is completed online or via a tablet, which is uploaded to a database of individuals who have self- excluded. All the AGCs that fall within a radius of the exclusion then receive notification that someone has self-excluded.


Due to data-protection, the AGCs do not receive an email with a photograph of the self-excluded individual, they simply receive a notification. Te operator then logs into the website, with their name and password, from which they can see from the carrousel of faces those people that have self- excluded from their arcade. Tey then make their staff aware that this person has self-excluded themselves from their premises.


Te duration of the self-exclusion will be for a six month minimum period up to 12 months, after which the individual must make an active decision to return


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