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Lewis Pek Editor


Comment May 2018


I’ve been so bombarded, not just with stories about the blockchain and cryptocurrencies, but with spam emails and text messages too, that I’ve started to automatically delete anything even slightly bitcoin related. I’m aware of the usefulness of cryptocurrencies to enable frictionless money transfers, but it’s tempered with a cynicism that says that such environments are equally open to abuse. So it was with reluctance that I tackled the issue this month, doing my research and background reading into Ethereum and smart contracts and the blockchain itself for my interview with Andre Wilsenach, panelist at the forthcoming IAGA Summit in Macau.


An expert on the subject, Andre explained the uses of the blockchain within the regulated gaming sector and that we shouldn’t lump together cryptocurrencies with the blockchain as they’re two related, but quite separate technologies. Email is to the Internet what bitcoin is to the blockchain. Bitcoin only exists because of the blockchain, but the facilitator can do so much more than provide a means to mint and mine digital currencies.


JAPAN WILL INSTIGATE A J-COIN IN TIME FOR THE OLYMPIC GAMES IN TOKYO IN 2020, WHICH WILL HAVE PARITY WITH THE YEN.


I also didn’t appreciate the extent to which government agencies are exploring the uses of the blockchain, even to the point of instigating their own versions of digital currencies. While an institution like the Federal Reserve in the US has stated that it’s not pursuing cryptocurrencies at this time, it’s also true that it and practically every other government financial body is researching the hell out of it right now. Countries like Japan have gone so far as to instigate a JCoin in time for the Olympic Games in 2020, which will have parity with the yen.


It’s interesting when so much of the forthcoming debates at both the IAGA Summit in Macau and the EUROMAT Summit in Monte-Carlo (both featured prominently in this issue), discuss the issues surrounding alternative payment solutions and the way in which both land-based and online gaming operators are looking for ‘out of the box’ solutions.


While I still think the issues surrounding bitcoin and the plethora of new currencies being minted smacks of opportunism, there will be solutions that become the ‘gold standard’ in the gaming sector. The blockchain, however, has been declared as the most significant change to the technology landscape since the Internet, and so it’s worth investing your time in exploring a topic that’s only going to prove more and more invasive in the future.


EDITORIAL


G3 Magazine Editor Lewis Pek


lewis@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0) 1942 879291


G3Newswire Editor Phil Martin


phil@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7801 967714


Features Editor Karen Southall


karensouthall@gmail.com Consultant


John Carroll carroll@carrollconsulting.de


International News Editor James Marrison


jamesmarrison@gmail.com Contributors


Phil Horne, Zane Mersich, Nick Harding, Mike Bolsover,


AG Burnett, Andre Wilsenach ADVERTISING


Commercial Director John Slattery john@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7917 166471


Advertising Executive James Slattery james@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7814227219


Advertising Executive Alison Dronfield alison@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)1204 410771


PRODUCTION


Senior Designer Gareth Irwin


Production Manager Paul Jolleys


Subscriptions Manager Jennifer Pek


Commercial Administrator John Pek


P6 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE /MARKET DATA


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