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Among the other issues covered includes a cap on the number of casino visits a player can indulge in. Te agreement now is to permit perspective players to only three visits over any seven consecutive days and 10 visits per month which would be a 28 day uninterrupted period.


A report in the Japan Times in February said lawmakers had suggested utilising the integrated circuit chip inside government issued Identity cards to limit Japanese citizens and foreign nationals living in the country to a maximum number of visits to casinos.


However with a slow uptake on ID cards known as ‘My Number Card’ – apparently only 10 per cent of eligible Japanese population have this card – it is thought the government may look at using biometric identification technology for locals wishing to enter the casinos. Tis could involve fingerprint scans, facial scans or eye scans. Melco Resorts recently gave a demonstration of its MelGuard biometrics system which they say could contribute as a


Te bid to create a player safe environment means the policy makers have now started to address the problem of addiction and are now working on a


responsible gambling bill and is looking to pass this before the end of its session in June.


database system listing anyone excluded. Already technology using fingerprint and face scans can be found at some immigration check points in the Asia Pacific region.


Since October 2017 three units of Panasonic Corp facial recognition systems have been put into operation at Tokyo airport immigration control whilst in February this year Panasonic announced it would launch its face recognition server software in July outside Japan and from August in Japan. Other topics agreed on during a March/April meeting was limiting the size of the


gaming floor to three per cent of the total floor area. Previously a cap of 15,000sq.m floor area was suggested but this has been rejected with no clarification as yet on what overall IR space will be permitted.


Te two parties have also struck on a deal on the entrance fee to be charged to locals with a fee of ¥6,000 (US$56) being settled on. Komeito had wanted an ¥8,000 fee whilst the LDP was looking at ¥5,000 having initially wanted just ¥2,000.


NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE /MARKET DATA P109


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