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Events


IAGA SUMMIT Macau 2018


A secondary responsibility in the face of such an event is to ensure the gaming areas are secure. If the event is something like a fire on property or a power outage, security staff from the hotel can work with gaming enforcement staff to alleviate any issues with visitor ingress or egress and lockdown of gaming areas and machines or tables if need be.


response equipment and resources;


(d) Te location of any unusually hazardous substances;


(e) Te name and telephone number of the emergency response coordinator for the resort hotel;


(f) Te location of one or more site emergency response command posts;


(g) A description of any special equipment needed to respond to an emergency at the resort hotel;


(h) An evacuation plan;


(i) A description of any public health or safety hazards present on the site; and


(j) Any other information requested by a local fire department or local law enforcement agency whose jurisdiction includes the area in which the resort hotel is located or by the Division of Emergency Management.


Per statute, these plans are confidential and must be securely maintained by the department, agency and state Division with whom they are filed.


Compared to first responders such as local fire and police, one would not assume gaming regulators would play an extensive part. Still, it is important that regulatory staff be engaged with the first responders so that if needed the regulators can help in a moment’s notice. Te task force briefings were certainly helpful in that regard, with merely the enhanced communication being of great benefit to all.


It goes without saying, however, that when an P70 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE /MARKET DATA


emergency event occurs there is no amount of planning that can address the chaos and confusion that is bound to erupt. As Mike Tyson famously said, “Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.”


THE FOG OF WAR No one can truly anticipate a natural disaster or


a terrorist act. Further, no one can anticipate or have foreknowledge of an event like the Route 91 shooting. Tere were no signs or warning signals that gave the Board a clue that this could happen. Task forces wisely assume that is going to be the case prior to an event, so all that can be done is develop the ability to communicate disasters and coordinate efforts once they occur. My notification was a series of texts and phone calls, and then of course the national media.


Te Enforcement Division communicates constantly with Clark County law enforcement authorities, so when the incident occurred the Division was fully aware of the situation. Members of the staff were sent to the scene to see if they could assist.


Te Enforcement Division is comprised of statutorily-defined peace officers that are given full powers of arrest. Tey are trained officers who, in many cases, are former police officers themselves. Tis was crucial for the Board during the event, because these peace officers knew what to do and became an instant part of the police community in Las Vegas responding to the attack. Te “triage” involved goes something like this: Determine if a gaming property is involved; determine if Enforcement Staff are present and are engaged in the event, and send staff to the location as soon as possible.


Assuming the event occurs at a gaming location, the primary responsibility of the gaming


enforcement personnel should be to assist regular law enforcement. At such a point, they may have to rely on their previous years of law enforcement. Tey may have to assist in crowd control, location security, evacuation of victims, medical triage, and potentially even assisting on eliminating the threat.


A secondary responsibility in the face of such an event is to ensure the gaming areas are secure. If the event is something like a fire on property or a power outage, security staff from the hotel can work with gaming enforcement staff to alleviate any issues with visitor ingress or egress and lockdown of gaming areas and machines or tables if need be.


Mandalay Bay presented some confusion, because it was the location where the shooter was, but not where the victims were. Te actual gaming premises were not an issue, but the hotel and location across the street were. When the casino floor is the actual issue, the first to respond will likely be the casino’s security staff. Terefore, the casino should have adequate training in place for those officers so that they can respond immediately and efficiently. In Nevada and in most major casino locations throughout the world, there are competent trained staff well-equipped to handle an emergency, but nothing can replace training and communication with law enforcement in the jurisdiction where the casino resides.


It is that communication that enables a swift response in the face of chaos.


Lastly, certain Enforcement Division officers were dispatched throughout gaming locations in Nevada to simply walk the casino floors and monitor things. One of the primary statutory duties of the GCB is to ensure the safety of the public. It was therefore to monitor various


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