This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
g


Bank of Egypt (NBE), BLOM Bank and Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank. In 2013, Misys had a Kondor+ win and Temenos gained


Arab Investment Bank Egypt (AIBK). The latter took T24 and a range of other applications, aiming for a first cutover in head office and two branches in July 2014. Part of the plan includes Shari’ah banking. During the selection, the bank talked to Temenos customers in the country (the supplier claims ten of these), and visited Suez Canal Bank. In 2015 , Temenos had 1 more win with Arab African International Bank selecting T24. 2014 saw a pick-up in activity, with five wins. An


interesting deal went to Oracle FSS, with Flexcube chosen by Bank Audi (a deal which also included Iraq). Flexcube also won an additional deal for Oracle FSS in 2015. Being replaced in Egypt is the bank’s legacy BankMate offering from French vendor, Capital Banking Solutions, which is also a subsidiary of the Lebanese bank. Another foreign bank making a selection was Qatar National Bank Al Ahli, choosing Ethix. One local vendor is B&F Soft, although most of its core


banking system activities have been outside its home country (in Libya) to date. In Egypt, it is a long-standing provider of the TurboSwift Swift interface device which now resides with Fundtech. Polaris Software, the company which got itself


rebranded as Intellect Design, saw its


lending module being selected by National bank of Kuwait for the Egyptian operations.


Ethiopia


Ethiopia has been a busy market for core systems in the last few years, with a largely regulatory-driven flurry of selection processes that peaked in 2010 when seven deals were signed. The National Bank of Ethiopia had mandated its member banks to automate their services. Part of the initiative included a national payment system to facilitate automated settlements and inter-bank money transfers. Three of the 2010 deals went to Temenos, two to Oracle


FSS and two to India-based Infrasoft with its OmniEnterprise system. This compared with a couple of small deals in 2009 (one each for Infrasoft and Neptune) and the same number in 2008 (Neptune and Temenos). By 2011 this round of regulatory-driven activity had


largely abated, with the only deal in the country, at NIB Ethiopia, going Temenos’ way. NIB International Bank was Temenos’ fifth customer in the country, and had 50 branches. In 2012, there was something of a pick-up. Misys


recorded a Bankfusion Universal Banking win at Awash International Bank (to replace its old Bankmaster system), Infosys had success at Bunna International Bank, Polaris at National Bank of Ethiopia, Infrasoft claimed start-up, Addis International Bank, and there was one small Temenos success.


The project at Bunna International Bank looked fairly


typical and was part of the bank’s expansion strategy. The bank had 17 branches at the time of the selection but, with new technology in place, planned to double its network within the next few months. Finacle was taken for retail, corporate and trade operations, front-to-back office. National Bank of Ethiopia itself selected a new core


system, taking Polaris’ Intellect, in its Quantum Intellect form (tailored for central banks). It signed in Q3 2012 and set about replacing Bankmaster, cutting over after a delayed project in November 2013. During 2012, in a second phase of regulatory


intervention, the central bank paved the way for eleven new banks, driving some of the activity. There were a number of selections running in 2012 and 2013 as a result, but not all were conclusive. During Q3 2013, Enat Bank was preparing a new tender for a core banking system. It was thought that the start-up bank selected OmniEnterprise from Infrasoft in Q3 2012 but the vendor later confirmed that the deal had fallen through. The selection continued through 2014. Debub Global Bank was known to be seeking a new


core banking system during 2012 but the decision was deferred.


In August 2012, the start-up had reportedly


drawn up a shortlist of Infrasoft, Oracle FSS, Temenos, Delta Informatique and Neptune Software. However, one month later IBS was told that the bank was evaluating domestic vendors only. In the end, in 2014, it contributed the only selection in the country, opting for Flexcube. Despite the setback at Enat, Infrasoft is relatively


well entrenched in Ethiopia and has a partner in Fairfax Technologies. It claims six


OmniEnterprise takers


comprising Wisdom Microfinance, Wegagen Bank, Oromia International Bank, Co-operative Bank of Oromia, Oromia Credit and Saving Share Company and the aforementioned Addis International Bank. In 2013 and there was then only that one decision


in 2014 at Debub Global Bank. However, a number of selections were seemingly nearing a conclusion. Oromia International Bank’s search for a new Islamic banking had reached the shortlist stage in Q1 2015. As mentioned, Infrasoft with OmniEnterprise is the incumbent and was one of the candidates vying for the deal. Purely for microfinance, OMO Microfinance, which provides loans, voluntary savings and insurance products in southern regional states, has opted for Neptune’s microfinance-specific Orbit-R offering. In 2015, Oracle FSS won 1 bank in Ethiopia for its Flexcube Product


Gambia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia


These countries are among those that make up the West African Monetary Zone and have been seeking to overhaul their payments, clearing and settlement infrastructure,


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com 99


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294