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the nod at three institutions in 2011 (Banque Morval among them), although none in 2012 or 2013. HSBC made a notable system selection in late 2013


to cover its private banking and wealth management operations in Switzerland and neighbouring countries. The contract went Avaloq’s way, with IBM to be heavily involved in the implementation. The Avaloq platform will replace a mix of in-house and third party systems. Temenos was considered at an earlier stage, but the final decision came down to ERI and Avaloq. One decision to watch out for in 2014 looked as though


it would be at Switzerland-based private banking group, Julius Baer, which was looking for a new core banking system to cover its Swiss and global locations, which would span over 50 locations across 25 countries after completion of the integration of Merrill Lynch’s International Wealth Management business.


In the end, there had been no


decision by the end of the year but Temenos gained the nod early in 2015, beating Avaloq. However, Avaloq had three additional wins in 2014 and,


as mentioned above, added BIL Suisse and 1 more deal in early 2015, to replace Sungard. Notable was a win for Sungard during 2014, at Incore Bank, with a plan to offer a BPO service to banks in Switzerland and Lichtenstein. We’ve oscillated with regards domestic supplier,


Finnova, which spans retail and private banking. At present, despite starting to move outside its home market with a win in Liechtenstein (Lamda Privatbank) in 2011, to add to Neue Bank here in 2009, it looks too domestic to include on the Sales League Table. However, it had four more wins at home in 2012, including Neue Privat Bank (NPB), Banque Cantonale du Jura and Zuger Kantonalbank. In 2013 it added Basel-based Remaco AG, an asset management firm and start-up, Zähringer Bank, in early 2015.


UK


This is another relatively inward looking market. There is a mix of established domestic suppliers and a relatively small number of proven systems from international suppliers. There has been a relatively high-level of change, with bank bailouts, new entrants (Metro Bank, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Virgin, Aldermore Bank, Handelsbanken). These have tended to go once more for proven systems – Fiserv’s ICBS/Signature, FIS’s Profile and Temenos’ T24. The UK government, unlike many, still has a proactive policy of encouraging more banks, rather than trying to reduce the number. Sainsbury’s went with FIS’s Profile in 2013. At the lower-end, a fair amount of the UK market uses a number of hosted platforms,


from other UK financial


institutions and third party suppliers. Often, these are centred around mortgages. As elsewhere, there is the possibility that these providers will need platform refreshes from time-to-time. A few are struggling and there have been rumours of consolidation.


270


Among the UK players are DPR Consulting, Nostrum,


Pancredit, Phoebus, Sword Apak, Target Group, Unisys UFSS, Vertex Financial Services, Welcom (which seems to be doing well in the payday loan sector although the largest of these entities, Wonga, has in-house developed systems) and White Clarke Group (the latter is the only one that has non-UK activities of any note, selling a solution for auto and asset finance, leasing, and loan origination from point-of- sale through credit approval, contract management, and customer support). There are also some service bureaux, including Capita, HP (it took over the business of Yorkshire Key Services during 2013), Skipton Building Society’s HML (now bought by Computershare) and Newcastle Building Society Solutions. Sword Apak had two wins during 2013 for its relatively


new Aurius platform, at Wesleyan Bank and Close Brothers. At Wesleyan, Aurius is replacing Misys’ Bankmaster. Although French owned, Sword Apak has not to date broken out of the UK market but it is becoming a notable force in the lower end at home. Unity Trust Bank and the unrelated United Trust Bank were the first two takers. It added Julian Hodge Bank (the fourth Bankmaster user to sign) and Secure Trust Bank in 2014. The latter, a lending specialist, was the supplier’s first taker for its solution on an ASP basis. Quite a few of the UK building societies use an old


platform, Summit (now MSS), that has gone through several changes of ownership. It now resides with French supplier, Sopra, which bought the UK operation of struggling Finnish supplier, Tieto. Sopra also has the Callataÿ & Wouters- derived Thaler for the UK (it is used at UK government entity, NS&I) but has not stated that there is any plan to migrate the Summit users. On the lending side, a proliferation of payday loan type


companies has brought sales for domestic suppliers. On a more established footing are a number of government entities that provide loans and require lending systems to underpin their activities. The Green Deal Finance Company (GDFC), which supports the acquisition and management of Green Deal Plans, which are effectively unsecured personal loans to finance energy efficiency measures for home- owners and landlords, with repayments coming directly from future utility bills, opted for the lending system of domestic supplier, Nostrum, in 2013. A far more established UK government entity, the


Student Loan Company (SLC), was out to tender for systems during 2013 as part of a major IT transformation. It provides loans and grants to students at universities and colleges in the UK and is expecting to invest up to £100 million to replace its core systems over the next ten years. Its shortlist of vendors comprised mainstream players, due to high volumes (it was seeking solutions that were proven for 45,000+ loans). Despite the volume criteria, SLC selected HCL and Deloitte, which jointly bid with Misys’ Bankfusion Universal Banking offering, in spring 2014. The shortlist


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