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internet banking, and compliance. These were followed by Aim Bank, National Bank of Andrews and one off-the-record bank. All of these were existing users of the legacy Trinisys system. Prior to this, Temenos had seen one major u-turn in the US, when a partnership with Metavante came to an abrupt end when this supplier was bought by FIS. Metavante had been tailoring Temenos’ high-end retail banking system, TCB, for the US market. Other than this, most of Temenos’ few sales over the years in the US have been to the foreign operations of international banks. Via the Metavante tie-up, the first fully-fledged core


banking software deal for Temenos, at Florida-based Everbank, had come in the second half of 2008. The initial plan of going live in 2009 did not materialise and nor did the subsequent plan of launch in late 2010/early 2011. By H2 2011, the bank told IBS it ‘had no updates to share’ and no news on the go-live has transpired to date. In 2011, Temenos had a slight pick-up after two successive years with no US sales, gaining Banco de la Nación Argentina. Temenos had also reported 1 sale in the year 2015, similar to that of Infosys and TCS. It is a similar patchy picture for Oracle FSS’s Flexcube.


Silicon Valley Bank (SVB) uses Flexcube among other Oracle applications. The bank positions itself as ‘a well-rounded 360 degree customer of Oracle’ in the US, said Prashant Nema in 2010, CIO of SVB at the time (he left the bank in 2013). Its ‘good horizontal span’ of Oracle’s products includes financial business process management (BPM), content management, ERP software and middleware solutions. Oracle FSS also has a couple of other domestic Flexcube


users, but on a more niche scale. At Federal Home Loan Bank of New York, for example, the system automates demand deposit accounting (DDA). This bank signed for Flexcube in 2008. Oracle FSS had added two more deals in 2010 from domestic banks, plus a smaller deal at a foreign bank (Turkey’s Vakifbank). Oracle FSS has had a mix of domestic and international bank sales in the US over the last few years, including People’s Bank in 2006 (which seemed to come to nothing, with this confirmed by a source at the bank in late 2008), Federal Home Loan Bank of New York in 2007 and start-up, E3 Bank, in 2009 (although this bank never took off). Oracle FSS had three deals in 2012 for Flexcube, of which


two looked to be international corporate/commercial banking in nature. One of these was among the year’s standout deals, a multisite agreement with Wells Fargo. Oracle FSS’s other win was for domestic lending and leasing. It had no additions in 2013. Infosys has not had the happiest of times in the US. As


mentioned, it came second at Zions. It also had a setback in 2011 with the core system replacement project at Union Bank in California. Speaking in mid-year to IBS, John Itokazu, just days into his role as the bank’s new CIO and


COO, put the Finacle roll-out firmly ‘in the past’. When the deal originally surfaced in late 2008, it sent the Infosys share value soaring. The bank put a price tag on its project at $200 million, with the aim being to consolidate 30 different systems onto the new single platform. The Infosys statement to IBS about the project’s shutdown referred to ‘Union Bank’s changed business priorities’ and assured that parting was ‘on amicable terms’. However, there is a long-running implementation


of Finacle at Discover Financial Services, with a lot of US institutions seemingly watching this project with interest (it stemmed from a deal for the Indian supplier in 2010). The first delivery, going live during 2014, was the deposits functionality. Consumer loans were touted to go live in 2015, followed by student loans in 2016. On the lending and treasury/capital markets fronts,


Misys has a reasonable presence. In 2011, for instance, its syndicated lending offering, Loan IQ, was taken by four financial institutions, one of which was Atlantic Capital Bank in Atlanta, Georgia. Main rival, ACBS from FIS, had three US deals. The previous year, ACBS had five deals, representing a clear pick-up after one in 2009. In the same year, Loan IQ had no deals after five in 2009 (and despite a reasonable year elsewhere around the globe). Neither Loan IQ nor ACBS had new-name core deals in 2013. On the treasury/capital markets side, Misys’ OpicsPlus gained one new taker in 2011: Ohio-based FirstMerit Bank. FirstMerit took OpicsPlus for its FX business to replace spreadsheets. It also took Misys’ trade finance product, Trade Innovation, to replace the IBSnet system from rival Surecomp. The solutions are supplied on a hosted basis. There was one more sale reported in 2015, for the FusionCapital Opics from Misys, and 4 deals for its Lending suite.


Another treasury vendor, Murex, clinched two deals in the US in 2011 for its MX.3 product. Not a bad result considering that Murex’s rival, Calypso, which stems from the US and has a strong domestic presence, gained just three new-name wins here in the course of the year. Two of these were Federal Home Loan Banks, of Des Moines and of Indianapolis. Calypso already had Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco on its user list as, in 2009, the bank took Calypso’s technology to provide an IT platform for debt issuance, hedging and wholesale lending. The supplier reported two more additions to its US clientele in 2015. US-based FSS, which also specialised in the TCM space, had the same number of domestic deals as Calypso in 2011. This included Zions Corporation, plus First Republic Bank and RJ O’Brien Securities, for its Spectrum treasury system. FSS was acquired in early 2013 by Wall Street Systems/Ion Trading, not something that has typically proved to be a boost to sales of the purchased systems. Calypso and FSS had led the way with five sales each in 2010, followed by Openlink and Wall Street Systems with a


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