This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
g


been poor, with Temenos in particular having a succession of failures a few years ago. Oracle FSS/I-flex has traditionally done better and this was the Indian company’s first market of focus when it arrived on the European mainland with Flexcube. Of domestic suppliers, Allshare has a small user base


(eight domestic players) but has lacked new sales. On the lending side, there is a Dutch base for ComponentBanker, an acquisition in 2007 by Sopra from domestic Dutch supplier, Business Architects. It is intended to complement this supplier’s established Evolan lending suite. There is also Able, BinckBank’s IT and services arm, which


provides the Syntel (now known as Europort+) system to banks on an onsite and BPO basis. There are around 14 Europort+ takers. In late 2013, BinckBank announced its intention to sell the Able business (there had been no sale by the end of 2014 and it was announced that the BPO services would be gradually phased out). There are a couple of emerging suppliers. Five Degrees


has a front, middle and – it is claimed – back office lending solution. Its product stems from the technology that underpinned failed Icelandic financial institution, Icesave, with the IPR bought for a nominal amount (this explains why its other office, aside from Breukelen, is in Reykjavik, along with a number of the developers). Knab, which uses the middle office in front of Thaler/Sopra Banking Platform, is one of the initial customers; Crédit Agricole Consumer Finance in the Netherlands was taker number two. Another emerging Dutch player is Amsterdam-based Ohpen, which has a front-to-back office system for mutual funds and savings accounts, with Robeco as its first user. While the Netherlands saw seven selections in 2011


and three in 2012 (so more deals than most in Western Europe the last few years), there have been none of the core selections by mid-tier Dutch banks of the pre-crisis years (rather too many of which ended in failure, for different reasons, including a high profile one at Van Lanschot, with ERI’s Olympic as part of this). In fact, in 2013 and 2014 there were no selections, large or small. Prior to this, Oracle FSS won a notable order from


specialist institution, Leaseplan, in 2009. SAP had a lending deal from a niche offshoot of a mid-tier domestic player in the same year and there was a handful of treasury selections. SAP’s Loans Management was taken by one of the large banks in 2010, there was a win for Oracle FSS at a smaller institution, and Norway-based CBA gained a trade- related deal at ABN Amro as the bank sought to rebuild its international operations, running from a hub in the Netherlands. In 2011, Oracle FSS built on its Dutch presence, with two of its three deals in Western Europe coming in the Netherlands. AzerTurkBank awarded contract to Oracle FSS in 2015. Thaler/Sopra Banking Platform is relatively strong in


the Dutch market, having originated from neighbouring Belgium, and Rabobank is a heavy user. It changed hands


in early 2012, from Callataÿ & Wouters to Sopra, and had added just one new deal to its Western European tally in the previous year, NIBC in the Netherlands. In new ownership, the system had a relatively good 2012, with two additional deals in this country. It added 1 deal in 2015.


Nordicregion


There is a relatively small number of large to mid-tier banks in each Nordic country. Where there are large clutches of small banks, such as Norway’s Sparbanken, these tend to use service bureaux. There is a small number of such bureaux in each country. In Denmark, Danske Bank and Nordea have around 67


per cent of the total market by assets. There are slightly under 130 other financial institutions. Sweden is an efficient country from a banking systems


perspective and, as with its Nordic neighbours, there is a high level of straight-through processing (STP) and online banking, in its different forms, plus other innovations such as e-invoicing and making credit applications within retail stores. There have been some new banks (online banks as well as moves by established securities firms and credit market companies to become banks) and increased competition. The country has somewhat more than 100 banks, across commercial banks,


foreign banks, savings


banks and two co-operative banks. The four big banks are all commercial banks: Swedbank, Handelsbanken, Nordea and SEB. The fifth largest is Danish player, Danske Bank, which made an acquisition of Ostgota Enskilda Bank in the late 1990s. Swedbank tends to provide technical solutions to the


numerous, independent savings banks (there have been some mergers in this community). DNB, the largest bank in Norway, has been going


through some significant changes in the last year or so, including signing outsource deals for parts of its IT with HCL and TCS, somewhat reducing its traditional dependence on Evry (EDB, as was), which has a long-standing back office outsource business in the Nordic region, largely based on in-house developed systems. Here, it claims around 120 users. The Sparebank/Sparbanken in Norway are supported


by the EDB/Evry platform but with some signs that this might change, with a few of the larger banks known to be evaluating other options. Norway’s second largest bank, Sparebank 1 cancelled part of its Evry contract in 2011, for strategic development, with this having been largely around building and renewing the core banking and other applications on an ongoing basis. For the existing core system and surrounding applications, at least for the time- being, Sparebank 1’s relationship remains in place with Evry for application management, support and production. Other hosted options in the Nordic region include: BBS/ Nets in Norway; Swedbank, CGI/Logica, Tieto in Sweden;


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com 267


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294