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outside suppliers. A new entrant on the African market (but long-standing


player), Greece-based Intrasoft, won a deal at four Rwandan MFIs in 2012, comprising Kamabuye, Kibungo, Musanze and Ubak, brokered by its local partner and the Rwanda Microfinance Association. Talks then started with another group of MFIs in the country. There was also a Temenos T24 win in Rwanda in 2012,


at the National Bank, the country’s central bank, replacing a system called IBIS 2000. Oracle FSS, Polaris and SAP were beaten to the deal at the shortlist stage. Given there had only been one deal over the previous


few years (for Delta Informatique), this represented something of a pick-up in the market. There is innovation in the country, with Bank of Kigali and


Urwego Opportunity Bank working with Visa on a mobile money project. There is also at least one local system here, dubbed Superbank, which has installations here and in one or two surrounding countries, including Burundi (Ecobank was a user of Superbank in both countries, but this was replaced within the multisite Flexcube roll-out). Neptune had a win for its Rubikon system in 2014, at


Unguka Bank, and Temenos had another success. The former was moving from microfinance bank to full commercial bank. It became the first taker of Rubikon in the country and set about replacing its ageing Finance Solutions system from Uganda-based Sigma Data & Computers. A core banking selection that started in 2014 was at the


Rwanda Co-operative Agency (RCA) after it was granted funding from the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning to modernise the co-operative banking sector. RCA issued a request for expressions of interest, to be submitted by 22nd September, to unify the 416 co-operative banks, or SACCOs, under a central Co-operative Bank. This was to replace a locally developed Cobol-based


legacy system. In 2015 , Sopra Banking Software won 2 deals for their Sopra Banking Amplitude. Neighbouring Burundi, emerging from a twelve-year ethnic civil war, has been very quiet on the banking IT front. There is now focus on rebuilding the country, so it looked as though there might be some activity in the future and, indeed, a selection was made of Capital Banking Solutions’ CapitalBanker during 2014 at Banque de Gestion et de Financement (BGF).


Senegal


This country has tended to be dominated by the French suppliers, particularly Delta Informatique (now part of Sopra), which is the market leader by some distance. Viveo had won some deals as well, prior to its acquisition by Temenos, including Crédit Mutuel du Sénégal and Banque des Institutions Mutualistes d’Afrique de l’Ouest (BIMAO)


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in 2008, but SAB is notable by its absence. Path Solutions gained from the opening up of the market to Shari’ah banking, with a project at Banque Islamique du Senegal, starting in 2010. The bank, which is owned by Tamweel Africa, which in turn is owned by Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD), had a cutover here in 2013, moving from a local supplier, Meteosoft. Sopra had another win in 2014, while there was a treasury and capital markets success for Calypso. Senegal has 20 or so banks and a relatively strong MFI


sector, so that it is a fairly competitive market, with the arrival in recent years of foreign banks to add to the long- standing French incumbents. At the same time, the majority of the population remains outside the banking sector. There has been growth in GDP and relative political stability. La Financiere De L’Afrique De L’Ouest selected Capital Banker from Capital Banking solutions in 2015.


Somalia


Lebanon-based core banking solution supplier, BML Istisharat, secured a win in October 2013. This was at International Bank of Somalia, which hoped to open for business in February 2014. The bank chose the Islamic version of BML’s ICBS core banking offering following a selection process in which Temenos was the other finalist. The last stage of the selection took place in Dubai, and involved a detailed walkthrough and demonstration of the core banking solutions on offer. Joe Faddoul, CEO of BML, said Somalia as a country lacked banking infrastructure and he predicted that purchasing equipment, building premises and hiring staff would prove challenging, so too the telecoms infrastructure. Path Solutions gained two wins in 2013 in Somalia, as


the Shari’ah banking sector started to take shape. One of the two start-ups was Premier Bank, signing towards the end of the year. Prior to this, there was only one bank in the country,


apart from the central bank (although it is arguable there wasn’t even a central bank for many years after the fall of the government in 1991). The pioneer was Salaam Somali Bank, which opened in 2009. This was followed by another Mogadishu-based Islamic bank, First Somali Bank, which opened in May 2012. Before then, Somalia relied on informal hawala, or money-changing networks, as sections of the banking industry were blacklisted by the US government as part of the War on Terror. There is now a fully functioning central bank and it might be that other African banks will establish operations. One remittance operator, Amal, chose a core banking solution during 2013, opting for Banco from Malaysia- based IDCorp. This system was expected to be running in early 2014. It was IDCorp’s first customer in Africa, with


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