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users, including Bank of Shanghai and Postal Savings Bank, and added another to the list in 2010. FSS’s win at China International Capital Corporation


(CICC) was its first in a


country it had been targetting for some time. In 2011, all the treasury and capital market systems


deals went to Misys, with six for Opics and two for Summit. The Opics deals included the Chinese branch of South Korea’s Hana Bank, China Minsheng Bank and Chinese Mercantile Bank (now incorporated into the ICBC brand and operations). For Summit, the deals were with Shanghai Pudong Development Bank and China Bond Insurance. The following year, Murex had the standout deal, at Bank of China. The total for Opics fell to two and Bank of Hebei selected Quantum/Ambit Treasury from Sungard. In 2013 Misys with Opics (one deal, so quite a contrast


with 2011), Calypso (one) and Sungard (three) were the treasury winners again. While Opics drew a blank in 2014. Murex had another notable deal, this time from China Citic Bank International. And Calyspso also closed 1 deal for core banking system in 2015. For core banking, heavyweights, as well as TCS, there


were single wins for Oracle, Temenos and SAP in 2014 (the latter’s success was interesting, given its previous project in the country – see below). Microfinance specialist, Mambu, bagged its first customer in China, Opportunity International (OI), a global non-profit organisation which offers loans of $20,000 up to $1 million to SMEs across Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe. OI is a long-standing user of Temenos’ T24 across multiple locations. On the domestic solutions side, FIS has a core banking


system that is sold only in China, bought in late 2006 from a company called AsiaInfo. The system, eCAS2, has around twelve users in the country, with Bank of Hebei and Bank of Fushun among the latest to go live (in 2010 and 2011 respectively). As mentioned, China has not proved the easiest country


to implement core systems but there were signs of progress in 2009. Large domestic IT services and software company, Digital China, was involved in several of these. Fiserv’s ICBS/ Signature gained an important cutover after three years of effort at Shenzhen Rural Commercial Bank (SRCB). This followed a failed project for the supplier at a signing in 2007, Citic Industrial Bank (rebranded later as China Citic Bank). The project at Jinshang Bank (as Taiyuan City Commercial Bank had now become),


for Digital China’s version of Sungard’s Symbols/Ambit, appeared to be nearing completion. Digital China worked on both projects. The same was true of one more project completed in 2009, at Bank of Qilu, which went


live with


Symbols/Ambit at the end of March 2009. It might be that these go-lives gave other banks the confidence to sign with international suppliers in 2010 and 2011, although neither Fiserv nor Sungard appeared to be recipients.


132


Indonasia has patches of banked and unbanked area. There is a presence of Universal Banks as well Islamic Bank. There are 11 banks per 100,000 people in the county. Indonesia has been relatively busy in the last few years. There have


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com


An extremely long-running project in the country has


been at China Minsheng Banking Corporation, which has been trying to implement SAP’s core system since 2005, first with assistance from Accenture and then with some help from local companies, for its network of almost 400 branches. One of the local companies was Giantstone, which has its own low-end core system, but was providing services for the SAP project, ahead of being bought by large but troubled domestic supplier, Longtop Financial Technologies. Misys won 4 deals; 3 for their Fusion Capital summit and 1 for Fusion capital Opics. SAP one deal for deposit management system while Murex won for MX3 system.


Hong Kong


For its size , Hongkong is well penetrated with 154 banks and 22 branches per 100, 000 customers. Hong Kong has produced low single figure totals of new system selections in the last few years, having been busier in the past. In 2010 Calypso won Hong Kong Monetary Authority for front-to- back trading and treasury management and it followed this up with a deal in 2011 at Hong Kong Exchange and Clearing Corporation, and at China Citic Bank in 2012. The other two deals in 2011 went to Temenos, which sold T24 to Bank Sinarmas and Wing Lung Bank. This meant nothing for Oracle FSS, which had signed a


which signed as mentioned


deal at China Citic Bank for Flexcube the previous year, and nothing for Misys, which had picked up the two treasury/ capital market deals in 2009, with its Summit system, at China Citic Bank (it wasn’t clear whether the later Calypso deal was as well as Summit or instead of it) and Hong Kong Mortgage Corporation. Aside from the Calypso win in 2012, the other supplier to gain success in Hong Kong was Avaloq, with its private banking system taken by the local unit of Agricultural Bank of China. Oracle FSS had a lending- oriented win in 2013; Sungard had a deal for its Front Arena treasury system; everyone else drew a blank. There were no sales for anyone in 2014. In 2015 4 deals were awarded, 2 were awarded to Oracle FSS, , one to Calypso technology. China Citic went for a system change and procured the Avaloq Banking suite. China CITIC Bank International is part of the cross-border commercial banking franchise of CITIC Group in Beijing


Indonesia


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