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Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Montenegro


Common names – Unicredit, Raiffeisen, Hypo Alpe-Adria and Intesa Sanpaolo – have strong holdings in Bosnia and Herzegovina, with Slovenia-based NLB also a notable player, with slightly under ten per cent of the sector by assets. Pexim, now owned by Asseco, is a dominant supplier in


Bosnia and Herzegovina, with sites as well in Kosovo and Montenegro (it added one more in 2014 in the latter and another in Bosnia and Herzegovina). Pexim rival, Antegra, also now owned by Asseco, had also picked up its first client in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2009, at Vakufska Bank. In 2011, Volksbank signed to implement the Antegra-derived Aseba BI in Sarajevo to replace a local system from Ping. Volksbank already used Aseba BI in Croatia. Austrian bank, Hypo Alpe-Adria, has implemented


Temenos’ T24 in its operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina (its Mostar-based operation and its Banja Luka subsidiary in Republika Srpska in the north). One development in the region in 2014 saw HP take


over the assets of ZIS d.o.o, the Belgrade-based IT services company of Hypo Alpe-Adria, thereby gaining the hosted facility running T24. HP intends to turn this into a commercial offering with an initial focus on Central and Eastern Europe. The first customer for HP is Hypo Alpe-Adria Bank itself,


which by the time of the takeover had T24 installed in Serbia (the largest, with 50 branches), Montenegro and the two in Bosnia and Herzegovina. HP has a five-year service agreement to support these sites as part of the takeover of ZIS, the financial details of which were not disclosed.


Bulgaria


Unicredit is the biggest Bulgarian bank in terms of assets. This followed the 2007 merger between Bulbank, HVB Bank Biochim and Hebros Bank to create Unicredit Bulbank. The second largest, DSK Bank, is owned by Hungary-based OTP. Greek banks are prominent. National Bank of Greece has an almost 90 per cent stake in United Bulgarian Bank, which had been created in 1992 through the merger of 22 regional banks. The banks avoided government bailouts in the wake of the financial crisis but the country has relatively low growth rates and high non-performing loans. Bulgaria has failed to produce any new-name wins for


seven years now, beyond two international operations which were part of multi-site deals gained elsewhere. Oracle FSS was the recipient of three Flexcube contracts in 2005/6, the last time there were signs of life from the domestic banks here. On the treasury side, Wall Street Systems and SAP had a deal each back in 2005. Bulgaria was included in the multisite roll-out of TCS Financial Solutions’ Bancsacross the international locations of Turkey-based Ziraat Bank (a


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2011 win for the Indian vendor). Emporiki Bank’s Bulgarian operation went live with


Flexcube in early 2010 as part of a group-wide strategy by Crédit Agricole (Crédit Agricole sold Emporiki Bank to another Greek entity, Alpha Bank, in early 2013). This was one of the earliest examples of a Flexcube release 10 implementation, and was delayed by about three months.


Croatia


The six largest banks are all in foreign hands. The largest is Zagrebacka Banka (Unicredit), followed by Privredna Banka (Intesa), Erste Bank, Hypo Alpe-Adria, Raiffeisen and Société Générale. Asseco gained the only deal in Croatia in 2012, from


Podravska Bank. Prior to this, Volksbank International had signed in 2011 to implement Asseco’s Antegra-derived Aseba BI core banking offering. As part of a wider decision, the bank had decided a few years earlier to implement Misys’ Midas in its international operations but the local accounting standards in ex-Yugoslav countries had seen this changed to working with Asseco in the region. A decision for Aseba BI was also taken for Serbia. Sberbank subsequently acquired Volksbank International and embarked on a core system selection for six countries, with the outcome still awaited. Société Générale went live in 2011 in Croatia with


the Delta Informatique-derived Delta-Bank system (now branded as Amplitude within Sopra Banking Software) as part of a multisite roll-out. A notable pre-crisis project in Croatia followed a


selection in October 2006 at Hrvatska Postanska Banka (HPB) of Infosys’ Finacle to replace in-house legacy systems operating on a decentralised basis. The bank also decided to take Infosys’ e-banking and treasury solutions. The roll-out at the bank was phased: the e-banking product went live in mid-2007, and Finacle Treasury followed. HPB migrated its banking functionality to Finacle in May 2010, according to a spokesperson from the bank. The government-owned bank was in the process of being privatised during 2013. There is a domestic vendor in Croatia, Abba, with a core


system called Novo Doba. The vendor’s roots are within Banka Sonic, where it developed the first version of its system in 2004. Banka Sonic, now Banco Popolare Croatia since its acquisition by the Italian group in 2006, remains Abba’s largest customer by branch number, with about 40. It now has a handful of other customers in the country, including Nava Banka, a private bank in Zagreb, and Alfa Leasing. Another domestic supplier is Vestigo, which has a J2EE-based core system, Sirius, in use at Raiffeisen Bank in Croatia. The company also has a card management system that is heavily used by Diners Club.


Czech Republic This is another country with large foreign ownership of


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