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After such patchy activity, TCS’s win in 2014 at Bank


Yahav stood out, not only from a country perspective but also a global one, in another relatively quiet year with few large deals anywhere. The win included domestic retail and corporate banking, digital channels, wealth management, trade and treasury. It has 45 or so branches and has been steadily broadening its activities in the last few years after starting out with a focus on services for public sector employees. There were 2 deals awarded in 2015, Ehud Neor Limited, procured Probanx’s Core plux. While Bank Leumi Bank Leumi selected T24 of Temenos for its Core banking platform.


Jordan


Much of the demand in Jordan in recent years for new systems has been among non-banks. It has been fairly patchy overall, with a peak of seven deals in 2009, but then none in 2010, three in 2011, and a solitary win in each of 2012, 2013 and 2014. The country has a relatively small population and is


served by 26 banks, of which there are three domestic Islamic players. Easing of restrictions has seen new entrants in the last decade, typically from other countries in the region. The banks have been fairly resilient but the country has not been immune from political tensions and from the effects of the Arab Spring in neighbouring countries. ICSFS is the main domestic supplier. It actually has


Jordan/UK-ownership and used to go under the name of Computer & Communications Systems in the region. A number of its domestic users, such as Jordan Investment Bank and Jordan Kuwait Bank (a subsidiary of Kuwaiti group, Burgan Bank), also use its ICS Banks system for international operations. The three 2011 signings were Housing Bank for Trade


and Finance, which signed for Infosys’ Finacle, plus Military Credit Fund and Jordanian Kuwaiti Financial Leasing (leasing venture of the aforementioned Jordan Kuwait Bank), both of which signed with ICSFS. In 2012, the only deal was a relatively noteworthy


one, with Jordan Ahli Bank choosing Temenos’ T24. The project was an enterprise-wide IT modernisation, with the bank replacing a host of legacy systems domestically and at its international locations in Lebanon, Palestine and Cyprus. The technology overhaul was part of an ongoing transformation programme at Jordan Ahli Bank – the oldest and one of the largest banks in Jordan. The vendor already had a presence in the country, with T24 roll-outs at Cairo Amman Bank and Capital Bank of Jordan, both of which were 2009 signings.


Kuwait


Kuwait is home of Path Solutions (majority owned by Kuwait Finance House) and ITS but deals are fairly widely spread


among vendors. The standout one of the last decade, which was followed by a fairly painful and long project, was at National Bank of Kuwait for TCS’s Bancs in 2006. There is a total of 22 banks comprising ten local banks,


one specialist bank and eleven foreign banks. Of the ten local banks, half are Islamic; of the eleven foreign banks, seven are from the GCC region. Burgan Bank, part of the Kuwait Investments Projects


Company (Kipco), has been in expansion mode over the past few years. Since 2008, it moved four regional subsidiaries of its sister bank, United Gulf Bank (the investment banking arm of Kipco), under its ownership and management. These were Jordan Bank Kuwait, Tunis International Bank, Algeria Gulf Bank and Bank of Baghdad, which were combined under the Burgan Bank Group umbrella. United Gulf Bank and its subsidiary, Syria Gulf Bank, operate separately within the Kipco group. Both were long-standing users of the ICS Banks system from ICSFS and this system has been rolled out across the rest of the group. Kuwait Middle East Financial Investment Company


(KMEFIC), which signed for Temenos’ T24 in 2007, appeared to have scrapped the implementation by early 2013. This was one of the two investment firms in Kuwait with T24, the second being Kuwait Investment Company (KIC). The latter took Temenos’ core offering over a decade ago and continues to use it today, although it is not believed to be a particularly active user. In 2011, Oracle FSS gained a win at Kuwait start-up,


Warba Bank, but there were no other wins in the country. Infosys, with Finacle, recorded another solitary win, in 2012. There had been a single Nucleus FinnOne selection in 2010 but a few more signs of life in 2009, with Al-Ahli Bank Kuwait (ABK) taking Misys’ Opics and Kuwait Finance House subsidiary, Liquidity Management House, taking iMAL. In 2013, only Nucleus, with FinnOne at a domestic bank, had a success. 2014 saw an off-the-record win for Switzerland- based ERI while Temenos picked up a T24 deal at investment and wealth management specialist, Arzan Financial Group. In 2015 there was 1 deal which was awarded to Infosys while Gulf Bank awarded Intellect design contract for lending system.


Lebanon


Lebanon has provided steady business for local and non- local suppliers over the years. Some of the demand has been from non-banks. The different forms of financial company are often backed with private funds; some are linked to banks, some are sizeable, others are small start-ups. Domestic


banks are dominant (foreign entities


accounted for 16.7 per cent of assets at the end of 2012). The economy has been sluggish and there has been instability. Despite efforts by the central bank, Banque du Liban, to encourage Shari’ah banking over the last decade, the sector remains fairly immature. There were 73 banks


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