This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Italy


While Italy is the fourth largest banking market in Europe (after Germany, UK and France), it has been arguably more reliant on domestic and in-house developed systems over the years than any other in Europe, with a fair amount of this having an outsource aspect to it. There are a lot of banks (around 740), with 400+ small mutual banks and 37 co-operative banks, but it has seen virtually no penetration by outside suppliers other than within the treasury and capital markets sector. While the larger banks have taken packages outside of the country, at home they are largely centred on in-house systems or the offerings of a small number of domestic suppliers (Elsag is one). In Italy in 2009, Temenos gained a deal in the last quarter


from UBAE Banca (a Rome-based banking corporation funded by Italian and Arab capital) and Murex had a deal from a domestic corporate. Monte dei Paschi di Siena took T24 in 2010 in a notable deal, albeit for international branches. The historical twist was that this was where the roots of the IBIS system were from, now owned by Temenos after it bought Financial Objects. The selection of T24 preceded the bank hitting major losses, scandal and bailout. The other deal in Italy in the year was for Misys’ syndicated lending system, Loan IQ, a multi-site contract from Intesa Sanpaolo. Oracle FSS had one deal in the country in Q4 2011, at International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD); Misys gained a deal for its Thomson Reuters-derived Kondor+ treasury system in 2013. No outside vendors had a look in during 2014.


Luxembourg


Clearly, this has been one of Europe’s traditional wealth management centres and most of the package deals have been in this area, albeit it has been much quieter of late compared with its heyday. In fact, the Luxembourg domestic banking market accounts for less than one per cent of the total. The number of international banks has fallen steeply (220 in the 1990s, 142 as of September 2012). Sopra’s Thaler/Sopra Banking Platform is offered on a SaaS basis by Clearstream and has gained a couple of users via this route. The overseas banks occasionally produce selections. The


Luxembourg operation of Banca March signed for Temenos’ T24 in 2012. Swiss vendor, Sage SA, had a win for its Prospero system in Luxembourg at Almagest Wealth Management in 2011. Private banking activity in Luxembourg had been a bit more pronounced in 2010, with Avaloq gaining NordLB. Callataÿ & Wouters (ahead of becoming Sopra Banking Software) had two wins, one of which was a replacement of the NewBanking system at Banca Popolare dell’Emilia Romagna. Aside from private banking, there had also been a win for Calypso in the treasury and capital markets space.


266


In 2009, Thomson Reuters and Misys were the only winners here, with K+TP and Opics respectively (both now reside under Misys’ umbrella). One project in Luxembourg that has been in the spotlight has been at Nordea Bank. It has been implementing the latest versions of Temenos’ Odyssey-derived Triple A Plus front-end and the T24 core system as well as the supplier’s new multi-channel offering, Temenos Connect Advanzia Bank Advanzia Bank awarded contract for T24 to Temenos in 2015. Traditional leader in Luxembourg, ERI, has seen the


most pronounced drop-off in sales here, winning four for its Olympic system in 2007 but nothing after this until late 2013 when it secured a deal with Natixis Bank in Luxembourg. The bank was to replace Misys’ Midas, which has been used across the Natixis group for many years. It was understood Natixis in Luxembourg went through a formal selection process, with vendors such as Temenos and Avaloq on its RFP list. BGL BNP Paribas, one of the largest banks in the country,


was known to be in core system selection mode in early 2014 but no decision had been made by the end of the year. Temenos gained a deal at DNB Luxembourg, while Greek supplier, Profile, had a low-end investment management system deal. The deal at DNB, the subsidiary of the Nordic group, included Temenos Connect for digital channels. The bank is a small 40-person organisation that has two key business lines: private banking and mortgages for affluent and high net-worth Norwegians who want to buy second homes abroad. Go-live was planned for January 2016. Luxembourg was arguably more interesting in 2014 for a


deal that didn’t happen. This was at Banque Internationale à Luxembourg (BIL), the largest private bank in the country. It abandoned a roll-out of the Avaloq Banking Suite and also scrapped its plan to establish a joint venture company with the vendor, to provide BPO services based on the Avaloq platform to banks in the Benelux region. In a statement provided to IBS, the bank said: ‘BIL and


Avaloq have agreed to end the discussion regarding the creation of a joint BPO centre in Luxembourg.’ In addition, ‘BIL will continue to work with its own core banking system’. It was understood that the biggest stumbling point between the two parties was the doubling of the originally estimated budget. In fact, this episode did not stop BIL Suisse signing with Avaloq in Q1 2015.


Netherlands


The four largest banks have a combined share of total assets of 80 per cent and have 95 per cent of consumers as customers. They have tended to revert to ‘back to basics’ banking, particularly


focused on taking deposits and


making loans. There are also domestic mid-tier players such as Van Lanschot and specialists such as Triodos Bank. The track-record of Dutch banks with new systems has


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294