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database) and then come up with a definitive total for each system. The Sales League Table is divided into universal banking,


retail,


lending, private banking, and wholesale banking, colour-coordinated along these lines. There are always some categorisation decisions to make but most are clear-cut. There is the complication that some of the deals won by the universal banking suppliers will be for specific areas within the other categories. As such, the retail and private banking breakdowns, for instance, should not be construed as showing all deals in these areas. Some of the universal banking system suppliers are important players on the pure retail, wholesale, lending or private banking sides, winning deals that are wholly in these areas as well as the broad, universal ones. In terms of which systems qualify for inclusion in the Table, we have


to limit ourselves to systems that are sold on the international stage, otherwise the undertaking would be unmanageable. Particular countries where this should be born in mind are the US and others such as Russia that have a large number of purely domestic systems and suppliers. We provide separate analysis of these two countries and do not include the domestic suppliers in the overall Table. Where a few US suppliers appear, this is because they sell outside their home country and their totals include only their international wins. The analysis is also limited to the broad back office system suppliers, so not those with niche back office systems (for a single space such as futures and options), nor those that sell in other areas of banking or purely to the buy-side. As it is focused on back office system sales to banks, excluded are deals to corporates, those that are front office only, and those where other subsets are sold for niche areas. A word should also be said about the user totals. It is the number of known users, along similar lines to the sales analysis. The totals are based on the actual names that we are aware of, with this driven from our installation database.


The drivers for change Why do banks select new core systems, with all of the associated risks and


costs as well as other priorities, often with the latter coming with an immovable date set by the regulators? Are there set patterns that one gets to see when it comes to the types of adoption that banks are looking to adopt? More specifically, are there specific drivers that are resulting in the change that is being driven when it comes to back office, and more importantly, core banking platforms?


1. Regulation:


Well, the regulators themselves can enforce core systems change – there have been instances of this in the last few years in Ethiopia, Vietnam, India (initially within the large banks, with attention now on the small ones) and Belarus. Sometimes, the regulators brandish a stick, forcing banks to put their houses in order. Sometimes, it is a carrot, with a relaxation allowing financial institutions to broaden their activities, thereby driving the need for new systems (this happened in Malaysia, for instance, where a number of securities houses made selections a few years ago). A lion’s share of deals in 2015, for instance have been experienced in Africa in the last 5 years. 238 of the 1334 deals, to be precise, that this is a good 18% share of global deals. Africa has also seen an increasing trend over the last


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com 11


market overview


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