This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Callataÿ & Wouters’ Thaler (now Sopra Banking Platform), the year’s only deal here. In 2010, Oracle FSS had a win for Flexcube at Polski Bank Przedsiebiorczosci (PBP Bank, formerly WestLB). There was a lending systems deal for SAP in the country in 2007 and a core system win for FIS with Profile in the same year, at Bank Alior, but little else. In 2014, Misys gained success for its Fusionbanking Universal Banking system (Bankfusion, as was) at the start- up operation of a southern European bank, with this under wraps until it opens for business. On the treasury side, Infosys had success in 2010 with


the treasury portion of Finacle at Bank BPS. In that year, Eurobank’s Polish subsidiary, Polbank EFG, was the only bank taker around the globe of Thomson Reuters’ older back-end to Kondor+, KTP (the system and business now resides with Misys). Polbank EFG merged with Raiffeisen Bank Polska in late 2012 and is now known as Raiffeisen Polbank. The one deal in 2012 was for a treasury system, scooped by the market leader, Calypso, at PKO Bank Polski. Domestic supplier, Comarch (4000 staff, direct presence


in 19 countries), is a strong competitor in the banking space, with a wide range of applications, including for corporate internet banking and loan origination. It is seeking to build a full core banking system and has a project underway in the co-operative bank sector. FIS is seeking to revive business, launching a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) version of Profile for the Polish market with a local partner, national switch, Krajowa Izba Rozliczeniowa (KIR), during the second half of 2013. Poland also houses the large, listed, and highly


acquisitive Asseco, which has a host of core banking and other applications, many from its forays into surrounding countries. One selection


that is underway in Poland is at


government-owned Polish Bank, Bank Gospodarstwa Krajowego (BGK). It had reached the RFP stage by early 2015, with six vendors having submitted proposals. These included Asseco (the bank’s incumbent core system provider, with a legacy system called def3000), local IT consulting firm Sygnity, TCS with its Bancs core system, IBM, Spanish IT firm Indra with its Itecban system, and a partnership between local IT services firm Cube.ITG (a systems integrator of Oracle FSS’s Flexcube) and another local hardware and networking provider, Comp.


Romania


The largest bank in Romania is BCR, owned by Erste Bank, followed by BRD (Société Générale). Between them, they have around one-third of the market by assets but this is a rather more competitive and fragmented market than many of its neighbours. The purchase of two Romanian core vendors, Fiba (in 2008) and Probass (in 2009), brought a strong presence in Romania for Poland-based Asseco. Fiba had five core banking customers when it was acquired, and Probass a few


164


more than that. Fiba’s customers included Intesa Sanpaolo, Banca Româneasca (part of National Bank of Greece) and Porsche Bank. Fiba also served a number of foreign banks with specialist functionality for the local payments system and regulatory reporting. And it provided related applications, such as for card management, to other banks too. Probass’ customers included Eximbank, OTP Bank Romania, Bank Leumi and Banca Comerciala Carpatica. Fiba had been founded in 1997 and brought with it about 30 technical staff. Probass had been founded about the same time. At the time of the acquisitions, Remus Dorobantu, the


CEO of Fiba, relayed that much effort would be put into unifying the different core systems into one. Asseco gained the only core banking system deal in Romania in 2011, at Banca Italo Romena. In early 2013, Asseco began a project at Intesa Sanpaolo to replace Fiba’s Intbank core system with another offering, abSolut. Go-live took place a year later. In terms of sales by non-domestic suppliers, by far the most notable of the last few years was in 2010 when Oracle FSS sold Flexcube to replace Misys’ Bankmaster at ambitious local player, Banca Transilvania. This bank subsequently had a successful, if somewhat delayed and challenging, implementation. Romania has also seen the roll-out of Flexcube at Emporiki Bank, part of a group-wide strategy by Crédit Agricole (Emporiki was sold to Alpha Bank in early 2013). Replaced in Romania was a domestically developed system from a supplier called JVM Technologic, which had been in use since 1996. Flexcube went live during 2011. And in 2013, Volksbank in Romania opted for Flexcube to replace Misys’ Midas.


Russia


By the end of February 2014, there were around 850 banks (around 900 a year earlier), plus around 50 non-banking entities. The shrinkage has been due to mergers and acquisitions, bankruptcy and failure to meet the regulatory requirements of Central Bank of Russia (CBR). The regulator has been paying particular attention to the activity of banks below the RUB300 million (around $9.5 million) mark, which constituted about a third of the country’s banking sector. But there were a few high-profile collapses in the upper tier banking space too, such as those of Master-Bank and Investbank. There has also been a notable drop-off in start- ups and foreign entrants. Some international banks, such as Santander and Rabobank, have left Russia altogether. Others, including Swedbank and HSBC, have revised their strategies and curtailed retail operations. By early 2015, the number of banks in Russia had fallen further, to around 780. The core systems market in Russia comprises a number of domestic suppliers, with systems of various ages, strengths and weaknesses, against which the international players have sought to compete. A relatively small number of Russian banks have opted for non-Russian systems over


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294