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2013, with the project having been put on hold due to the political situation. This was at Wahda Bank, with iMAL running alongside Flexcube (the latter on an outsourced basis, provided by the Central Bank of Libya). The bank felt that its move into Shari’ah-compliant finance had to be underpinned by a fully-fledged Islamic banking system. Wahda Bank, which is part-owned by Arab Banking Group, was encouraged to implement iMAL after visiting another of the group’s subsidiaries, UK-based Europe Arab Bank, which had been using the system since 2007. Sopra Banking software had 1 win, for their Sopra Banking Amplitude.


Malawi


There are nine commercial banks and two discount houses, a mix of domestic and foreign. Malawi is one of Africa’s poorest countries. Only around one-quarter of the adult population is served by a financial institution; one step being taken by the government is to try to move from cash payments to electronic disbursement, within the ‘Better Than Cash Alliance’. The two heavyweight core banking system suppliers,


Oracle FSS and Temenos, have won a couple of deals each in Malawi in the last few years, and both have handfuls of older clients here as well. Oracle’s wins came at Reserve Bank of Malawi and Continental Discount House, while Temenos had successes at National Bank of Malawi (to replace Bankmaster) and FDH Bank. Neptune Software picked up a deal from Malawi Savings Bank in 2009. The solitary win in 2013 was for Infosys with Finacle


and came at 27-branch First Merchant Bank, which was a Flexcube user. There were no deals in 2014.


Mauritania


As an example of how regulations can bring a flurry of selections, 2012 in Mauritania was a case in point. Having only seen a single system selection back in 2009, the arrival of Islamic banking in the country unlocked four selections in 2012. Traditional player in this space (but not on this continent), Path Solutions, won two of these, with the others picked up by two French suppliers, Capital Banking Solutions and SAB. The notable loser was Sopra/Delta Informatique, which did not build on its base in the country. It has been in Mauritania since the mid-1990s, starting with a multisite roll-out by Banque Belgolaise, part of Fortis. Banque Mauritanienne pour le Commerce was added in 2009, while another multisite user, Attijariwafa, cut over in Mauritania as well. There was also no look-in for Temenos in the 2012 clutch. It won Banque Nationale de Mauritanie back in


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2006, but nothing since then till 2015 , where it opened its account again with 1 win for the Sopra Banking Amplitude software. In 2012, Path Solutions gained Banque Populaire de


Mauritanie (BPM), a wholly-owned start-up of one of the country’s largest financial services groups, Groupe Mauritanie Leasing. Path already had Banque Islamique de Mauritanie as its initial client in the country, part of a 2011 multisite Islamic deal from West Africa-based Tamweel Africa Holding, which is itself owned by the Islamic Development Bank. Path added a third customer, a start-up, Bank Al Muamelat Assahiha, in late 2012. The bank launched in April 2013 following a month and a half roll-out. Going a different route during 2012 was another Islamic


start-up, Maurisbank. It opted to become the first user in the country for the core banking system of French supplier, SAB. The system, SAB AT, was taken on a Software-as-a- Service (SaaS) basis and the implementation, starting on 2nd January 2013, was expected to take six months. The deal was gained via a Tunisian partner, Arabsoft. A rather put-out Path claimed not to have received an RFP from Maurisbank. Completing the set of 2012 wins, CapitalBanker was


chosen by Caisse de Dépôts et de Développement (CDD). CDD was a new entity, established by the Mauritanian government in spring 2011, and went live with the French supplier’s platform in November 2012, after work started in May/June 2012. Capital Banking had an established presence in Mauritania, with four other banks as CapitalBanker users. One selection that continued during 2013 was at the


country’s central bank, Banque Centrale de Mauritanie (BCM), which initiated a modernisation programme for the country’s banking system (including the introduction of Basel II and IFRS), and started to look for new banking software as part of this major overhaul. One off-the-record deal was concluded, with Sopra gaining another taker for its Delta-derived system. There were no decisions in 2014.


Mauritius


Mauritius has been a fairly active market in the last few years. There are 21 banks on the island of which six are local, 10 foreign owned, one is a joint venture and four are branches of foreign banks. While the economy has slowed, this is one of Africa’s wealthiest countries and has a relatively sophisticated financial services sector. There were no signings in 2013 but a reasonable number prior to this and a significant pick-up in 2014. Oracle FSS with Flexcube won the two deals on offer in


2010, at ABC Banking Corporation, which had converted from a leasing company to a bank, and at the country’s


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com


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