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the UK has an interesting system in Aurius. At the top end of the market, there is now the intriguing spectre of Oracle’s new offering, the Oracle Banking Platform, while SAP’s Deposits Management is perhaps starting to look like a higher end solution that a bank would consider once more, now that so many of the pioneers have gone through much pain and expense. Meanwhile, the knee-jerk reaction of banks, particularly


in these conservative times, is that they will not consider systems that do not have comparable live sites in their country. This is a ‘Catch-22’ scenario. The choice is likely to remain uninspiring and limited if no one will take a chance with an unproven offering. Temenos brought in a relatively large haul of deals once


more in 2012, after the smaller number of 2011. The one- year tenure of Guy Dubois as CEO might be cited here – did the dip and then the bounce back reflect the end of his strategy to be more selective in the deals that the company was willing to pursue? There was no escaping the low-end, geographically diverse nature of Temenos’ 2012 haul. Temenos won a couple in its Canadian stronghold, plus


an international operation in the US. One small international operation in Mexico was its complete haul for Central and South America, bar one in the Caribbean. In the Middle East, there was a much-publicised signing with Jordan Ahli Bank. There were a couple of other deals here but the biggest gains were in Africa (nine) and Asia/Asia Pacific (ten). Oracle FSS had one of the year’s stand-out deals, in the


multisite, corporate banking win at Wells Fargo. As we always state, quantity isn’t everything. How many small T24 deals equates to one multisite Flexcube win at a tier one bank, or vice versa? Once more poor in terms of transparency, which surely doesn’t help its progress or profile, Oracle failed to announce the vast majority of its deals. It made good progress in China (four deals) and also had


interesting corporate banking deals from a couple of other tier one banks – one in the US and one in Australia. Its two wins in Latin America were both in Chile, it had one in the Middle East, none in Central Europe, and its Asia/Asia Pacific haul outside of China comprised one each in Malaysia, Azerbaijan and Cambodia, and two in Myanmar. Somewhat less ‘scatter-gun’, it might be argued, than Temenos. TCS and the other domestic Indian suppliers once more had small domestic deals knocked off. Infosys, for instance, had no fewer than 99 co-operative banks and sahakari banks heading its way in 2012 alone, clearly en masse, rather than as a result of individual selections. In early 2012, National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (Nabard), the regulator of India’s co-operative banking sector, embarked on a core banking software standardisation initiative across all of the country’s state and district co-operative banks. The first phase of the project covered 140 banking entities (with another 270 expected to join at later stages), with Finacle supporting half of these. The other half went to TCS’s Bancs. Within the scope of the Table, TCS had the other stand-out deal of the year, at Zions Bancorporation in the


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US, although neither the bank nor supplier was talking about it at this time. It was a closely fought contest at the shortlist stage with Infosys and would clearly be firmly in the spotlight because other mid- to large-tier US banks that have gone beyond the domestic tried and tested have typically not had a happy outcome. Mystate in Tasmania, Banyan Tree Bank in Mauritius, and Qatar National Bank were among TCS’s other core deals. In the same mid- and higher-tier retail space as TCS are


usually Infosys and SAP. In fact, Infosys’ deals did not look too high-end this time, with one treasury-focused deal at a foreign bank in the UK, then core banking deals at a couple of lower tier banks in the Middle East, plus RobinsonsBank and one other in one of its strongholds, the Philippines, State Bank of Mauritius, two in Kenya, one each in Ethiopia and Nigeria, India Post at home, one in Sao Tome and another in Mongolia. Infosys is one of the suppliers that is most involved in long-term projects, so the roll-outs continued at ANZ operations around the world and at Standard Bank throughout Africa. SAP had become a force in Central and South America,


which was perhaps difficult to predict. Interestingly, only two of the deals in the year were for its flagship core banking system, Deposits Management, both in Brazil, with one a multisite success. The other wins were for the older Deposits and Loans Management systems, with the former selected in Germany, Mexico, Costa Rica and Angola. The lending system is typically sold alongside Deposits and Deposits Management (for all but one Deposits deal this year) and, to avoid double-counting, we included the standalone Loans Management deals as a separate count (we’ve chopped and changed a bit with how we have dealt with this mix of SAP systems, but this rather mirrors the vendor’s own strategy). Path Solutions is always a good indicator of how the wind is blowing in the Islamic banking sector, albeit now with heightened competition from traditional conventional banking system suppliers that have gradually broadened their support for this form of banking. Path wasn’t back to its levels of yester-year but 2012 was an improvement on the last couple. Oman was busy, with four deals, there were a couple in Mauritania, Burj Bank in Pakistan, two in Malaysia and one each in Tajikistan and Iraq (the latter country was much quieter than in the previous couple of years, as the banking sector started to settle down). Things were less hectic in the TCM sector, one of the areas


of banking that had stood up pretty well in the last couple of years (with that activity in large part due to regulatory changes). Calypso continued to mine a productive seam, with 14 more largely cross-asset deals, including a couple from exchanges. The geographical scope was quite diverse, from Asia Pacific/Australasia (Australian Stock Exchange and Bangkok Bank), through the Middle East (Bank Leumi Israel), Asia (Indusind Bank) and Europe (PKO Bank Polski in Poland and LCH.Clearnet in the UK), to the Americas (Banco Penta in Chile and US Bancorp). Calypso’s 2012 client scoop was the same as the Misys’


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