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g Independent commentary by country


Algeria Algeria is one of those North African countries that had reasonable core system sales pre-Arab Spring, but has been largely quiet since then, albeit with the expectation that it is likely to show demand once more. There had been deals for the heavyweights, Oracle FSS and Temenos, in 2009, at Banque de l’Agriculture et de Developpement Rural (BADR) and CNEP Banque, respectively. The leader in the Islamic banking space, Path Solutions, had gained a deal at Al Baraka Bank the previous year which included Algeria within a multisite roll-out and there was cutover in 2012 (the bank is a sizeable player in Algeria and is the largest provider of Shari’ah banking here). After several blank years for any supplier in the country,


French supplier, SAB, won a deal at state-owned player, Banque de Développement Local (BDL), in 2013. It has over one million clients and 150+ branches. It was a lengthy selection, starting in September 2010 with an RFP, and involving all main international vendors, including Oracle FSS and Sopra (formerly Delta Informatique, which gained a handful of sites in the country), plus a number of regional ones.


BDL was known to have re-tendered for a core system,


having chosen V.bank from Viveo shortly before this French supplier was acquired by Temenos in late 2009. V.bank is no longer marketed, and it is likely that Temenos attempted to persuade BDL to move to T24. It was suggested that the aforementioned T24 project at CNEP had not been going smoothly and may have influenced BDL’s decision. The bank refused to comment. Temenos stated that the project at CNEP had not stopped. Also in 2013, Algeria Gulf Bank implemented ICS Banks


from ICSFS. The bank had actually selected this system under its previous ownership in 2007, but the project


failed to materialise and the bank was still running its legacy platform, System Global Banking. It is now part of Kuwait-based Burgan Bank and this has been gradually standardising all of its country operations on ICS Banks. ICS had signed two banks in Algeria in 2007. One of these, Trust Bank, went live in 2010. While there were no decisions in Algeria in 2014, Bank


Extèrieure d’Algérie (BEA), another commercial bank, which had around 130 branches, released an RFP in February to replace its version of Sopra Banking Amplitude, derived from France-based Delta Informatique. The decision is not yet made. No bank placed any order in the year 2015 on any vendor.


Angola


The Angolan government’s ongoing reform process has led to a surge in the number of banks and the diversity of financial services. In the early 2000s the financial sector comprised just nine banks, the two largest of which were state-owned; it now consists of over 20, and privately- owned banks have a dominant share of the market. There is strong economic growth, largely driven by the expansion of the oil and gas sectors. About 78 per cent of the assets held by the Angolan banking sector are concentrated in five banks (BPC, BAI, BESA, BFA and BIC). Angola’s core banking system tally has been somewhat


up and down. In 2010 there were five selections but then zero in 2011, one in 2012 and zero in 2013. The five wins in 2010 were as many as had been recorded in total in the previous three years. Portugal-based Exictos (Promosoft, as was) then capitalised in 2014, with three wins in the country for its Promosoft FS core system. ERI, traditionally a stalwart of established private


banking markets, also won a deal in 2010, National Bank of Angola, and this was actually its second in the country, having won Banco Quantum Capital (later rebranded as Banco Kwanza Invest) in 2008. Delta Informatique had a deal in Angola in February


2010 from Banco Espirito Santo. In fact, while Delta (now owned by Sopra) signed with the bank in Angola (where it has Oracle FSS’s Flexcube), it looked as though the choice of Delta-Bank/Sopra Banking Software might be for other countries on the continent. The solitary selection in 2012 was for SAP’s Deposits system, the older, lower end core banking system within this supplier’s suite. In the pure MFI space, relatively new, cloud-based core system provider, Mambu, has made some headway. Promosoft/Exictos has been prevalent in this Portuguese speaking country over


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com 97


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