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Samba, and it did well in Indonesia, with three wins – Bank Artha Graha, Bank Mayora and BPR Karyajatnika Sadaya. It had a bigger haul in Africa than Oracle FSS, with five deals. Temenos also had a solitary, intriguing but off-the-record European deal for its seldom seen high-end retail platform, TCB.


Both mainstream suppliers had Islamic banking deals within their hauls (two for Oracle FSS, four for Temenos) but it was a second successive poor year for new-name deals for dedicated Shari’ah banking system supplier, Path Solutions. ICSFS with Banks gained the same number of new-name Islamic deals as Path – three – plus a couple of conventional deals. TCS’s Bancs often picks up the biggest deals around (Bank of China, Deutsche Bank, State Bank of India in happier times). One or two of its off-the-record wins in South-East Asia looked sizeable this time and it had one of the year’s few multisite deals, at Turkish bank, Ziraat, which was looking to standardise core banking software for international operations. There was also success at the Swiss Postbank. It was a good story for TCS again in China and it added one more credit union here. Another higher-end player, Infosys, actually increased


its new-name count in 2011. It won four reasonably sized institutions at home. It had another deal for the international operations of an Indian bank. Those takers with a non- Indian connection were mainly relatively small and came in the Philippines (two), Jordan, Nigeria, Belgium (ING), Sri Lanka and Central Europe. SAP was making less noise about its wins than in the past,


perhaps because of the subsequent experiences of some of those takers, but it built on its foundations for Deposits Management in Latin America and won Landshypotek in Sweden (a Flexcube failure in the past), RBS in the UK (centred on corporate banking), and one off-the-record deal in Benelux. While that wasn’t bad, the supplier had only three wins for its lending system, Loans Management, versus eight in 2010. Misys had four new licence wins for Bankfusion Universal


Banking, with this system not yet taking the market by storm but picking up a smattering of low-end deals. That total did not include the upgrades within its Equation and Midas bases, to Bankfusion Equation and Bankfusion Midas, with the Bankfusion layer merely ‘wrapping’ the old cores. The systems that had recently ended up owned by Sopra


had a fairly quiet time of things, with only two new-name deals for Thaler and five for Delta-Bank, albeit with the latter demonstrating further progress outside of its traditional French-speaking Africa stomping ground, with Ural Finance House giving Delta a second win in Russia. The Indian trio of Nucleus, Polaris and 3i Infotech did


okay. The former’s haul of 14 wasn’t bad, although it had 27 in 2010; three were in Vietnam. Wins in the core, lending and


wealth management back office segments for Polaris’ suite totalled 15 (as with TCS and one or two others, small sales of subsets of this supplier’s suite are not counted). 3i Infotech’s universal and lending systems had eight new-name deals, notably with three in Mauritius (which seemed a relative hive of activity, generally, in 2011) and two in Saudi Arabia. The treasury and capital markets space saw Calypso


have another good year, with a couple of central banks and one more exchange within its twelve new-name wins. Misys’ Opics was the market leader in Asia Pacific and South-East Asia, riding the wave of continued activity here – 13 of its decent haul of 18 were here (one in the US, none in Europe). The higher-end Summit had two wins in China and one in Japan, plus one each at central banking institutions in Africa and Western Europe. Like Opics, Spectrum from FSS continued to bring in good numbers of deals, with a mostly North American and UK slant. Murex continued to weather the storm fairly well too, with nine wins in 2011, up two from 2010. There was a big drop-off in new wins for Kondor+ in its front-to-back office form (pure front and/or middle office wins from the TCM suppliers are not counted). It was not a good year for the private banking system


suppliers, with a lot more of the activity in this space seemingly around portfolio management and delivery than on ripping and replacing the back office. Although the handful of specialist suppliers have had to go hunting further afield for business in recent years, Avaloq’s three wins and two of the three for Sage SA were in Switzerland and Luxembourg. Two of ERI’s three came in Morocco and Nepal. Sungard’s Apsys (now Ambit Private Banking) has not really broken out of Switzerland and its three wins were here. Temenos often holds its own against these suppliers but it seemed that few of the T24 wins were for private banking/wealth management in 2011. There were ever more vendors with only one or nil new- name tallies and it looked as though the niche and regional suppliers were having the toughest time. If the market is up in South-East Asia, for instance, or if there is a sudden spike in activity in an individual country, such as Brazil or Mauritius, then it is the global players that have the reach to follow the demand. The consolidation in the market might reflect this to a degree, with a couple more long-standing privately owned suppliers succumbing during the year. The market by the end of 2011 was becoming used to


doing business in a difficult economic climate, with long sales cycles, more chance that banks would get ‘cold feet’ and pull the plug on their selections, mostly low-end deals, and plenty of competition for the business that was up for grabs. While banks were similarly becoming used to operating in tougher times, there appeared to be some way to go before many of them decided to bite the bullet and finally press on with their core system replacements.


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com


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