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practices,


interfaces to local settlement networks and


passbooks (commonly used by bank customers in Japan), language and culture. The large banks have significant IT teams, an in-house development mentality, and turn to a few domestic IT heavyweights for services and software. In the mid- and low-tier banking market in Japan (comprising regional, shinkin and labour banks, credit and agricultural co-ops), NTT Data is the dominant player. It claims nearly a 100 per cent share in the low-end banking market (tier three and below) and a 30 per cent share of the tier two segment. For Temenos and Oracle FSS, you have to go back to 2006


for the last deals (Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation for the former, Rakuten and one off-the-record deal for the latter), ahead of Temenos picking up a deal at a niche player in the country in 2013. The other deal in the year was treasury again, going to Murex. Indian supplier, Nucleus, has been a provider of its


lending system in the past but won no new business for a few years and had seen a falling away of users, although it still claimed Shinsei Bank and Tokyo Star Bank. It made another step forward with the only win in the country for any supplier in 2014. There was only 1 deal in 2015, which was awarded to Misys.


Malaysia


Malaysia has traditionally been an interesting market, with some large banks, a fairly active treasury segment, and a burgeoning Islamic banking space. There was a significant peak in 2006, following which sales were steady without being spectacular, with six in each of 2010, 2011 and 2012. As such, the solitary win in 2013, for SAP with Loans Management, was a notable decline, so too the same total for 2014, a solitary treasury and capital markets deal, picked up by Openlink with Findur. There are 27 commercial banks, with a mix of local and


foreign ownership, 20 or so Islamic banks (this is a well- established sector, from the early 1980s) and 15 investment banks. There has been plenty of consolidation, with finance companies merged into commercial banking groups and with discount houses, securities firms and merchant banks brought into investment banks. The government has stakes in the two largest banking groups, Maybank and CIMB. The latter in particular has become a major regional player, although the six largest banks all have overseas operations. The leading domestic supplier is Silverlake. Sales of


its core IBM iSeries-based SIBS have been diminishing, although it has some loyal customers that bring repeat business. The clearest example of a major win at an existing customer was the 2010 signing of CIMB for a single platform, worth over $350 million, for its operations across Malaysia,


134


Indonesia, Thailand and Singapore. The new solution is a major constituent of CIMB’s enterprise-wide IT/operations transformation, with the overall costs projected at $670 million. Other components included financial reporting and management software, an HR system, a front-end for sales and a regional transactions banking system. CIMB also chose IBM to provide IT infrastructure, IDS Scheer for BPM applications, and Accenture as a primary consultant for programme management, with Silverlake building the core platform. Silverlake did also notch up a brand new win in 2012, at Malaysia Building Society. There has been heightened competition and one arrival


has been Path with iMAL. It had breakthroughs in 2009 at Bank Muamalat Malaysia and First East Export Bank (FEE Bank). Bank Mualamat signed for all modules of iMAL in late February for its 53 branches but the project was not a success. Path had been helped in the selection by having had a support office in Malaysia since September 2007, and could provide a reference in the country at RHB Islamic Bank. In fact, things also did not go to plan at RHB Islamic itself. A Path spokesman subsequently claimed that iMAL had gone live but that the bank planned to extend its existing system, FIS’s Systematics, to cover the scope of iMAL for reasons of ‘group strategy’. Path’s deal at FEE Bank was for a new operation in


Malaysia and an established one in South Korea. The bank was a subsidiary of Bank Mellat and this was Path’s first success with an Iranian bank. However, a year later FEE Bank became subject to UN sanctions and its assets were frozen. Two other Middle East suppliers had breakthroughs in Malaysia in 2012. ICSFS was selected by Middle East Investment Bank; BML gained Bank Simpanan Nasional. BML won the deal for its ICBS core system via a partnership with a local integrator, Heitech Padu, against competition from the domestic duo of Infopro and Silverlake at the shortlist stage. The ICBA system from Infopro is among the systems being replaced. Malaysian banks and other financial institutions had


previously been investing in treasury systems, with CCK one of the beneficiaries (four takers of its Guava Suite in 2006, Hong Leong Investment Bank in 2008). Thomson Reuters/ Misys (K+TP at Al Rajhi Bank in 2006, albeit later replaced by Trasset) and Sungard (with Quantum for single deals in 2007 and 2008) also made progress. This slowed in 2009 although the only deal in this sector was a notable one, with Murex gaining a breakthrough with MX.3 at one of the country’s largest domestic banks. Murex further added one more account to their credit in 2015. Malaysia has not been a happy hunting ground for the


universal banking heavyweights. Oracle FSS’s had a deal back in 2006 at Asian Finance Bank; Temenos won Avenue Securities in 2006 and Bank Islam in 2007, ahead of two off-


Market Dynamics Report www.ibsintelligence.com


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