This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
046


DETAILS [light talk]


Each issue we speak to an architect about their relationship with light. This issue Robert Such talks to Kim Herforth Nielsen, founder and principal architect of Danish practice 3XN.


COULD YOU TELL ME... ... what made you become an architect?


I met a group of architecture students on a journey to New Zealand after high school. They brought me along on a study trip and that caught my interest for architecture. Nowadays, I cannot imagine doing anything else.


... how important lighting is to your architecture? It plays a very central part. We never do a design without doing a close analysis of the daylight conditions first. Hence the light is a starting point for us in the creative process.


... what excites you about light and lighting? Natural light is a sign of life and the rhythm of the day. That is why it is so important for people to have access to daylight. Also, the course of the sun makes a building change within the day, and enhances and disguises different parts of the architecture. It makes the architecture come to life. When it comes to artificial light I believe it can contribute to creating ambience and a diversity that gives a building more personality and soul.


... why spending time thinking about and working with light is important to you?


I strongly believe that everybody should have access to daylight in their school, their workplace and their homes. I am convinced that it increases the general well-being, and therefore I always design buildings with lots of daylight. Good examples are Ørestad College in Copenhagen and Nieuwegein City Hall in the Netherlands. Also, we have often worked with light art, for example with Steven Scott in the Deloitte headquarters in Copenhagen.


... about how you approach lighting a building through architecture? We work with informed design. Through parametric design tools we can optimise the building design, taking into account sun patterns or see how weather conditions anywhere in the world affect our design. This allows us to design for effective energy and daylight strategies.


... about the role lighting plays in the life of a city? Lighting creates ambience and atmosphere. But it is not so that so much light necessarily creates more life in a city. Darkness also has its qualities. Diversity in lighting makes different activities possible, so I find that the play between light and darkness is what makes a city come alive.


... about the best and the worst illuminated places you have visited? Places like Venice and Rome are very good at illuminating the façades of the beautiful old buildings, and that creates a unique ambience that enhances the characteristics of the place. The worst light is the light that is used for illuminating highways. The orange light hides all other colours. I find it stressful and inhumane.


... about the importance of shadows and the balance of darkness and light in your work?


It is the interplay between light and darkness that makes a building come to life. It is amazing to see how much architecture can change with the changes of light. Take the façade of the Museum of Liverpool. The relief changes the expression and colour of the building within the course of the day and with the weather. www.3xn.dk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228