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188 TECHNOLOGY / THE ARC SHOW


AROUND ARC


Treille Technilum


Designed by Jean François Arnaud, Treille owes its name (‘trellis’) to its fretted, cast aluminium structure. Designed for exterior applications, the Treille is a hallow column, illuminated from within by a 70W MH PAR 30 CDMR lamp to produce a ‘cascade of light’ effect. Available in heights of 3.5m, 4.5m and 5m, each mast is topped by a single or double opening to house gobo projectors from Ludec or Masterline ES 45W lamps. www.technilum.com


A wide variety of technology was presented at The ARC Show 2012.


Crystalline Icicles Swarovski


E-CORE 3000 & 6000 Toshiba


These downlights employ DALI dim- ming drivers to maximise energy saving potential. E-Core 3000 is a replacement for 2x26W TC-D / 1x32W compact fluo- rescent downlights or even 35W metal halide downlights. With up to 2815 lumens it delivers 61 lumens per watt. E-CORE 6000 is a replacement for high mounted downlights in areas that are difficult to access and maintain. With over 5’000 lumens and DALI dimmable, E-CORE 6000 will easily replace 42W compact fluorescent, 70W metal halide and potentially 150W metal halide downlights. www.toshiba.eu


Represented at ARC by Nick Mailer Lighting, Swarovski’s new collection ‘Centrepieces’ are unusual luminaries that have been fashioned by renowned designers and offer an abundance of individual creative possibilities. In addition to the extensive assortment of sizes, colours, shapes and functions each model can be adapted to your personal concepts of space through customisation. Crystalline Icicles by S.Russell Groves was inspired by na- ture, ‘a flow of shimmering ice crystals as if illuminated by polar light’. The Icicles range also includes single and triple pendants. www.architecture.swarovski.com


Powerline and Flex Filix


This Linear LED fitting has been upgraded with a complete new chip board using Cree diodes. With a power consumption of 23W/m and more than 1500lm/m, this is a very versatile and well performing product. Hide it in coves or use it behind mirrors, under cupboards or wherever light is re- quired. www.filixlighting.com


Tornio DX Lamps & Lighting / Steon


The Torino DX is the first ever energy efficient, dimmable, high bay metal halide luminaire. It offers energy sav- ings up to 75% due to its integrated intelligent light management system featuring daylight dimming, occupancy control, absence dimming to 20% and zoned control. Manufactured in the UK, it features an IP65 faceted reflector offering excellent light uniformity and optimal light levels at 100 lumens per watt. Torino DX is easy to maintain due to its 30,000+ lamp life and is ideal for warehouses and retail premises. www.lampslighting.co.uk


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