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166 TECHNOLOGY / UK LIGHTING DESIGN AWARDS


Clockwise from top left Atmosphere Gallery at the Science Museum, London, DHA Design - Public Buildings; Bupa Wellness West End, London, Light Bureau - Workplace; DJ Light, Cinimod Studio - Special Projects; The Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Arup - Daylight; Columbarium “Liebfrauenkirche”, Dortmund, Germany, Licht Kunst Licht - International Interiors Project; Broken Light, Rotterdam, Daglicht & Vorm Rudolf Teunissen - International Exteriors Project.


strip that emits light through the clear poly- carbonate with a dichroic coating to one side. Individual control means a series of programs that vary throughout the day ani- mate the lighting to articulate the dynamic motion instilled in the design. The overall result is that the wings appear to have a crystalline and delicate appearance, with an iridescent colour that shift as one view- ers walk around it. The judges commended the design for its “perfect attention to de- tail. A stunning and playful sculpture that is lovely from a distance with excellent detail when viewed up close”.


LIGHTING FOR LEISURE


Lighting Design International won the Light- ing for Leisure Award for their work on ESPA Life at Corinthia. The judges described the project as a “fantastic lighting designer’s response to a challenging interior”. Senior Designer Ellie Greisen designed a creative scheme which complemented the differing mood of each of the four individually de- signed floors of the spa. The client experi- ence is the focal point of the design, with mood and ambience being the driving forces of both the interior design and the lighting design.


LOW CARBON BDP’s design team provided the lighting design, building services and internal fit-out for the 7 More London Development – the first major office in the UK to be awarded


BREEAM ‘Outstanding’ and winner of the Low Carbon category. The 48,000sqm building has 4,500 workstations and caters for 6,300 staff and aimed to adopt an intimate, bespoke approach to the light- ing plan for each work space area. The end design consumes only 7W/sqm with 35 per cent of the luminaires being LED and the remainder fluorescents. “A very effective lighting design that bears the badge of low carbon, perhaps the beginning of a new age for office lighting?” said the judges. Rapid developments in LEDs led the design team to write a performance specification based upon available products at the time of design and stipulated a technology harvest review shortly before the ordering dead- line. A sophisticated control system is used that includes absence/presence detection, daylight control and scene-setting.


PUBLIC BUILDINGS


The winning project of the Public Buildings category was the Atmosphere Gallery at the Science Museum, London by DHA Design described by the judges as “clever, thought- ful and visually stunning”.


The brief was to create an innovative light- ing solution, using entirely energy efficient sources without compromising the object lighting. What DHA achieved according to the judges was “not so much lighting de- sign, more like the creation of a space using light. There is great integration of the light- ing and the exhibition with well concealed


light sources, and impeccable attention to detail”.


WORKPLACE LIGHTING Light Bureau took home the award for best Workplace Lighting for Bupa Wellness West End, London. According to the judges “the scheme is excellent and achieves stimulat- ing lighting design. It turns what could have been another clinical environment into a series of stimulating spaces.” Light Bureau’s solution was to supplement or manufac- ture artificial daylight conditions by use of digitally controllable individual linear fluorescent lamps with ‘daylight’ and warm colour temperatures. The control system is intuitive and simple allowing ‘morning’, ‘af- ternoon’ or ‘treatment’ scenes to be set by clinicians and absence detection is provided to conserve energy. The judges said, “A well executed scheme giving the medical centre character and warmth, as well as being practical.”


SPECIAL PROJECTS


Cinimod Studio won its second award of the evening for its DJ Light installation in the Special Projects category. DJ Light is an im- mersive public sound and light installation that gives visitors the power to orchestrate a unique performance of light and sound across a large public space. Consisting of 85 giant globes of light, ‘guest DJs’ assume their position on the podium and can then use the movement of their arms to create


Pic: Cinimod Studio


Pic: Hans Wilschut


Pic: 8Build


Pic: Lukas Roth


Pic: John McLean Photography


Pic: Stanton Williams


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