This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TECHNOLOGY / LED 171


LED lighting pioneer Pete Earle MSLL believes we need to change the way we think about lighting design as the lighting specification market is changing.


THE LANGUAGE OF LED


Game changer: projects like Yas Hotel in Abu Dhabi by Arup, seen by a TV audience of millions during the first night-time F1 Grand Prix, put the design capabilities of LED on the map.


Pic: Bjorn Moerman


The art of Lighting Design is changing. As lighting systems evolve from static in- candescent and fluorescent to eco-friendly, dynamic solid state, the lighting industry and its markets are thrown into a state of rapid evolution and steep learnings, with the collision and fusion of the old and the new. The old technology makes way for the new technology, the new way very quickly becomes the old way, then that old way of doing business is replaced by the new way of doing business. With the new technology we need to learn a new language. And so it goes on, with LED lighting technology today, one of the last technologies to ‘go digital’.


THE MARKET


Consider the lighting specification market. The architects, lighting designers, consul- tants and design houses have to deal with not only new digital technologies but also


a new language. Alongside ‘luminous flux’ and ‘beam distribution’ there are words and phrases like ‘pixel’, ‘resolution’, ‘gamma correction’, ‘control protocol’, ‘SDCM’. Even the word ‘custom’ means something completely different when designing using LED technology than traditional lighting technologies.


The humble watt, the unit of power consumption for so many years used as an indicator of how bright a lamp or bulb is, no longer has the same meaning. An LED lamp can consume 5.5 watts yet illuminate a sur- face with the same light levels as a 50 watt halogen. Because LED light is directional, even the lumen output and the light output ratio of an LED fixture cannot be compared accurately with its traditional counterpart. Lumens per watt, and then lumens per euro, pound or dollar become important. Getting the ‘right light, to the right place,


at the right time’* using this LED technol- ogy is different than using traditional light sources. Illuminance and the basics of lighting design become more important than ever. With LED technology, we have to review every element in the design and product selection process for a project to ensure we know what we are specifying. The industry at large is slow to standardise and understand the new LED and control technologies. Specifiers, end users, building owners and customers therefore have to rely on the manufacturers and the system solutions providers to tell them the truth about what is possible, what they are buy- ing, how long it will last and what it can really do. Quality and performance seem to be unique to each manufacturer and what that manufacturer might claim, rather than a standard that professionals and consumers can rely on.


* ‘Right light, right place, right time’ is the design philosophy of dpa lighting consultants, gratefully reproduced with kind permission.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228